10 University Collections on YouTube

berkeleyyoutube2.jpg[NOTE: Be sure to see our updated page: 70 Intelligent YouTube Video Collections]

Since October, universities have been getting busy and setting up shop on YouTube, enough so that it seemed worth putting together a collection of what’s out there. As you’ll see, universities aren’t always using YouTube to distribute educational content to the outer world. It’s sometimes about that. But it’s also often about “selling” the university — about PR, in short. Below, we’ve put the more meaningful collections at the top of the list. Over time, we’ll add new video collections as they come online, and we’ll continue to distinguish the good from the only so-so collections.

1.) University of California – Berkeley: This channel was launched in October, and it contains over 300 hours of academic programming. Most notably, you’ll find here a series of university courses that can be watched in their entirety (for free). It’s a deep collection worth starting with.

2.) MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology): It’s a new collection and it already has some good meat to it. Click here and you will find clips from classroom lectures, many presumably coming from MIT’s ambitious OpenCourseWare initiative.

3.) UChannel: Spearheaded by Princeton University, this video service presents talks on international/political affairs from academic institutions all over the world. You can find a more extensive video collection on the UChannel web site.

4.) EGS (The European Graduate School): Here we have a video collection on YouTube that includes talks by important theorists/philosophers of the past generation — for example, Jacques Derrida and Jean Baudrillard. There are also some filmmakers mixed in — take for example, Peter Greenaway and John Waters.

5.) Vanderbilt: There’s hope for this channel in the future. The initial set of substantive videos can be found here.

6.) USC (University of Southern California): Find lectures here and videos of artistic productions here.

7.) Duke University: Borderline collection. Some interesting content, and I’m hopeful that it will improve over time.

8.) Purdue University: Heavier emphasis on promotional content; less emphasis on truly educational content.

9.) Oxford University Saïd Business School: So far this is highly tailored to marketing the b-school and helping students through the application process. This is not necessarily a bad use of the medium. But it’s not what we typically focus on here.

10.) Auburn University: Here’s a case of a university using YouTube for mostly promotional purposes … at least so far. I’m told by the university, however, that the collection is in its “infant stages” and plans for new, less promotional content are in the works. Keep an eye out.

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  1. Stuart Glogoff says . . . | February 21, 2008 / 1:34 pm

    The University of Arizona’s YouTube channel went public in late January 2008. At this time, our focus is largely as a resource that high school students and college undergraduates might turn to for information about student life, academic programs, and promotional videos about the UA. In addition, we are uploading selected public lectures that have had a broad public interest as tracks in iTunes U or videos that could be helpful to high school and undergraduate students researching a topic. See http://youtube.com/arizona

  2. Arthur says . . . | March 24, 2009 / 7:40 pm

    One of Yale University’s channels offers great content as well:

    http://www.youtube.com/user/yalecourses

  3. Teaching Degree says . . . | March 27, 2009 / 12:29 am

    These are some fantastic resources. The video lectures from MIT are just what the doctored ordered!

  4. Online Learning in Higher Ed – Sharon Ching | education + design + technology says . . . | April 18, 2010 / 7:37 am

    […] Additional info: here […]

  5. maxx says . . . | September 29, 2010 / 10:19 am

    May I also recommend the University of New South Wales in Australia. They have a lot of mathematical and computer science content available by some professors I’ve found extremely inspiring. Enough that I have considered moving to Australia ;)

    http://www.youtube.com/user/UNSWelearning

  6. Meredith says . . . | October 22, 2010 / 12:02 pm

    Southwestern University has been improving its video narrative collection as well: http://www.youtube.com/InsideSU

  7. SIAST Launches YouTube Channel « EdTech @ SIAST says . . . | October 26, 2010 / 1:33 pm

    […] very own YouTube channel joining other institutions including the University of Regina and several other well-known post-secondary institutions. Currently the channel has videos promoting SIAST as a whole as well as some promoting the […]

  8. Quora says . . . | January 21, 2011 / 11:41 pm

    What are some examples of successful university-level course websites?…

    I think MIT’s opencourseware[1] is quite popular. They started off with a select set of topics, but now they have scaled out impressively. [2] lists some of the other popular initiatives but most of them concentrate on video lectures and might not enc…

  9. Alberto Jimenez Arroyo says . . . | June 5, 2011 / 5:42 pm

    like received

  10. Fernando Balandran says . . . | May 7, 2012 / 10:57 am

    University of Missouri Kansas City has some good videos college algebra,physics and many others great content. I go to college but the commodity of being at home and study at you own pace rewind the video watch it again is just priceless specially when this videos has great content and from some good schools.

    http://www.youtube.com/user/UMKC/videos

  11. comment says . . . | December 13, 2012 / 3:00 pm

    This is my first time pay a quick visit at here and i am really
    pleassant to read all at alone place.

  12. John says . . . | April 19, 2013 / 6:41 am

    any one know where to find lectures on BBA program subject including marketing, management,finance etc

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