History, Power and our Global Society

Here’s a new, free course from Stanford University. Taught by James Sheehan, the History of the International System (iTunes) offers a historical view of international politics in the 20th century, exploring how international players have attempted to project their will and protect their interests, all while negotiating fluid and not always manageable external forces. The course looks back at communism, fascism and liberalism, then moves through the Cold War to the present day, and ends with current events in Iraq. An important historian and one of Stanford’s finest lecturers, Sheehan was recently President of the American Historical Association. So far four lectures have been posted (see here), and there will be more to come.

NOTE: This course has been added to our collection of Free Online Courses, where you can find about 120 top-notch courses.

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  1. Anne Frid de Vries says . . . | March 13, 2008 / 1:02 am

    Wow, I have been waiting for this one. I was alerted by Prof Anderson (Berkeley, from the History 5 course http://webcast.berkeley.edu/course_details.php?seriesid=1906978513) that this was coming up.
    What makes me wonder: why can’t one subscribe to the feed? Stanford on iTunes U has a couple of courses that act as podcast, like the Historical Jesus, by Tom Sheehan and Patrick Hunt’s lecture series on Hannibal, those are syndicated and treated in iTunes as podcasts.
    However, quite a few like this one can only be obtained by active download.

  2. Brian Hope says . . . | March 14, 2008 / 7:07 am

    As per the above, though I am in the U.K. I thought what a great idea but it will not download into iTunes. Is it restricted to US only?

  3. Katheryne says . . . | March 15, 2008 / 1:33 pm

    Sounds fairly interesting, but i cant download it.

  4. Dan Colman says . . . | March 15, 2008 / 2:38 pm

    Can you please explain what exact problem you’re encountering? That would help me troubleshoot, and I can relay the info back to the Stanford podcast team.

  5. Katheryne says . . . | March 15, 2008 / 4:57 pm

    Oops, sorry for that, everything is ok now.

  6. Jeff Burns says . . . | March 16, 2008 / 10:28 am

    I think it’s very Ironic that as the internet and streaming video is making it easier for us to share our knowledge (as Vannevar Bush imagined in his 1945 essay ‘as we may think.’, the universities of this country are pushing prices beyond the capabilities of the lower classes. Biggest problem this country faces is the price of college balanced against the prospects of a job.

  7. leon187 says . . . | April 9, 2008 / 11:47 pm

    how can i download it without itunes? maybe there is alternative apps?

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