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  • rosanna says:

    Please take a look over the ocean:
    Federica 2.0”: open access to education, in Italy
    A comprehensive e-learning portal established in 2007 at Federico II University in Naples, Italy, is launching its release 2.0. Joining the Open Education Resources community, “Federica” provides free, open and easy access to an amazing collection of educational resources – not just for students of the local institution but for any Internet users worldwide.

    After five years of research and innovation, Federica 2.0 now offers over 100 courses covering all 13 University departments — from Engineering to Medicine, Social Studies and Agriculture. Content currently available online include more than 2,000 lessons, 1,600 documents, 20,000 images, 300 videos, and 600 podcasts. Each online course provides access to lesson abstracts, research material, multimedia resources, video and audio files, extra Web hyperlinks. [10march09]

    With its innovative design and great usability, Federica portal interface is setting a new standard by combining together two popular communication tools: Power-Point presentations and the Smartphone. Also, its open access policy and extreme flexibility enable what can appropriately be defined as a revolution in Italy’ higher education field.

    The entire content is released under a Creative Commons license

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