The Wisdom of Carl Sagan Animated

Back in 1990, Voyager 1 snapped a photo of planet Earth from a record distance – 3.7 billion miles away. And there we saw it, our home, Planet Earth, a small blue dot almost swallowed by the vastness of space. This image inspired the title of Carl Sagan’s 1994 book, The Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space, which captivated millions of readers then, and still many more now.

Almost 17 years later, The Pale Blue Dot continues to give creative inspiration to many, including filmmakers who have created beautifully wrought films synced with narrations of Sagan’s book. (See here and here.) Then we have this new addition: The Pale Blue Dot put into animation by Adam Winnik, an animation student who took Sagan’s “scientific poetry” and turned into his visual thesis project at Sheridan College in Wyoming. Enjoy…



Make knowledge free & open. Share our posts with friends on Facebook, Twitter and other social media platforms:
Share on TwitterShare via emailShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrSubmit to StumbleUponDigg ThisSubmit to reddit

by | Permalink | Comments (12) |

Choose a comment platform

Comments (12)
You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.
  1. Robin Öberg says . . . | April 27, 2011 / 10:23 am

    Just remember, Carl Sagan is the guy who started Scientology.

  2. Stephen Curry says . . . | April 27, 2011 / 11:03 am
  3. James Reyes says . . . | April 27, 2011 / 2:30 pm

    Dude, get your facts straight please. Don’t besmirch a great scientist like Carl Sagan by confusing him with a clown like L. Ron Hubbard.

  4. cosmicjeebus says . . . | April 27, 2011 / 5:50 pm

    Wow…that’s about the most wrong statement I’ve read on the internet. Do you also think Hitler started the March of Dimes?

  5. Josh Verienes says . . . | April 27, 2011 / 6:18 pm

    wrong, please don’t mislead the readers.

  6. Josh Verienes says . . . | April 27, 2011 / 6:20 pm

    Regarding @Robin Öberg comment, of course

  7. Anita says . . . | July 27, 2011 / 2:22 am

    ‘Scientific poetry’, what a perfect way to describe how Sagan wrote.

  8. David White says . . . | February 25, 2012 / 11:47 pm

    This is my favourite post on Open Culture. I never get tired of watching this video. It’s wonderful.

Add a comment

Loading Facebook Comments ...
Quantcast