Anyone know what law these dancers were violating, since the arresting officer apparently doesn’t know (or won’t say)?

Update: This article/post gives you the backstory. It explains that the dancers were “there protesting a … court decision [handed down] earlier this month that upheld a ban on dancing within the memorial.” The members of the “civil danceobedience” were charged with demonstrating without a permit, and then released a short time after. That’s the answer to the question, in short…

via BoingBoing


by | Permalink | Comments (36) |





Comments (36)
You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.
  • Laamanen Steven says:

    these silly fucks have no respect for where they are….

    • PS says:

      No, I think they understand what freedom and respect mean. They were dancing to honor the man who said “Timid men prefer the calm of despotism to the tempestuous sea of liberty.” I think Jefferson might be talking about you.

    • Ganeshaa23 says:

      No, I think you have no respect for where these American Citizens were. I truly wonder at the utter disrespect these policemen and the Judge have for the Constitution. There is absolutely no reason this should have happened!

    • GC says:

      I agree with you Laamanen, these cops have absolutly NO respect for where they are…  Thanks!

  • MD says:

    They were not given a warning. That being said this video is a sad state of affairs. Respect to the people who started dancing after the couple were arrested.

  • Ammo63rambo says:

    the only problem i saw here were the fascist police exercising tyrannanical power over “free” americans who werent really doing anything wrong. they werent demonstrating and i dont see why they shouldnt be able to dance in the memorial.  the police may have been doing their job in some way but it seems they looked really stupid. these people were just tourists having a little fun. if a “no dancing ” law exists then they should be required to post signs stating that instead of just walking up to people and spoiling their fun. ive been paying taxes all my life for police to protect me against serious criminals. not to arrest people for dancing. and having spent the first six years of my adult life serving my country proudly in the military i hate to see CRAP like this in my country!! and ive been to the jefferson memorial. and jeffersons house, monticello. and jefferson would be turning in his grave if he saw this video.  one of my uncles died in ww2 and he helped crush the nazis. we certainly dont want that type of behavior here in america with our police. its no wonder terrorists, illegals and drug dealers are flooding our nation. the cops are wasting time arresting people for dancing. how pathetic!!

  • Hanoch says:

    These people were deliberately disobeying the law and intentionally provoking police officers who are charged with enforcing the law.  Like children, they had absolutely no point to make aside from attempting to demonstrate that they should be able to express anything they want, where and when they want to do it.  That is simply not the law in this country.  The D.C. Circuit ruled that the Jefferson Memorial is legally categorized as a “nonpublic forum” which means that “the government may reserve [it] for purposes that preclude expressive activity”.   The Court explained that “[i]n creating and maintaining the Jefferson Memorial in particular, the government has dedicated a space with a solemn commemorative purpose that is incompatible with the full range of free expression that is permitted in public forums.”  

    Obviously, if everyone decided to disobey laws with which they disagreed, there would be chaos and everyone would be worse off for it.  If these people felt that the regulations governing conduct at government memorials are incorrect, then they should act like grown-ups and make their views known through proper means.

  • Mike says:

    Anyone who’s ever spent much time in Washington, D.C., knows that protests go on there every day.  But there are rules.  And in some spaces (like the interior of the Jefferson Memorial) there are rules of decorum.  If you were standing in front of the U.S. Constitution at the National Archives, for example, you might glance up at the First Amendment, and then over at the crowd of tourists, and conclude that this would be the perfect place to hand out pamphlets for Jiffy Lube, offering $5 off the next oil change. When security arrived you could point to the First Amendment and shout self-righteously about Thomas Paine and the Rights of Man. But you’d still be a jerk.

  • Ks222 says:

    Clearly and unfortunately not surprising display of a grotesque abuse of power. This is not behavior indicative of either service or protection. I’m sure that the people dancing would have made Jefferson proud for standing up for their right to free expression. If anything Jefferson would have been ashamed of the unnecessary force used here. These people dancing were not offensive when taken in context nor were they causing any harm to others. It is sad to see the eagerness of the officers towards violence. It is completely within one’s rights to resist unlawful arrest / unlawful force. Power to the dancers! This should not end here, we should make Jefferson proud by demonstrating with dance DAILY.

  • Ks222 says:

    Clearly and unfortunately not surprising display of a grotesque abuse of power. This is not behavior indicative of either service or protection. I’m sure that the people dancing would have made Jefferson proud for standing up for their right to free expression. If anything Jefferson would have been ashamed of the unnecessary force used here. These people dancing were not offensive when taken in context nor were they causing any harm to others. It is sad to see the eagerness of the officers towards violence. It is completely within one’s rights to resist unlawful arrest / unlawful force. Power to the dancers! This should not end here, we should make Jefferson proud by demonstrating with dance DAILY.

  • Ks222 says:

    Clearly and unfortunately not surprising display of a grotesque abuse of power. This is not behavior indicative of either service or protection. I’m sure that the people dancing would have made Jefferson proud for standing up for their right to free expression. If anything Jefferson would have been ashamed of the unnecessary force used here. These people dancing were not offensive when taken in context nor were they causing any harm to others. It is sad to see the eagerness of the officers towards violence. It is completely within one’s rights to resist unlawful arrest / unlawful force. Power to the dancers! This should not end here, we should make Jefferson proud by demonstrating with dance DAILY.

  • Anonymous says:

    The complicity of the citizens in these comments indicate that America has fallen. You have a constitution it clearly enables the freedom of expression. This isn’t advertising this is expressing an opinion at a public memorial for a figure important in terms of framing the idea of freedom of speech.

    Instead the posters here defend the use of excessive violence, in one case body slams and choking, against people who were gyrating.

    • Hanoch says:

      If anything is an indicator of America’s demise, it the pervasive  misunderstanding and disregard of the U.S. Constitution, and the condoning of lawless conduct of the type evidenced here.  The Constitution manifestly does not permit unbounded freedom of expression.  You cannot walk into someone else’s house or a retail establishment and spout off at will.  Nor could you do so in a public library.  Supreme Court precedent has always recognized that the rights enumerated in the Bill of Rights — including freedom of speech — are constrained by the need to account for competing interests.  The D.C. Circuit ruled that the decorum restrictions at the Jefferson Memorial are constitutionally sound.  It is a fundamental underpinning of this country that when the courts rule on an issue, the citizenry must conduct itself accordingly, whether one agrees or disagrees with the ruling.  The alternative is chaos.

  • TAM17 says:

    Why were they stopping them from dancing anyway? Before the court case put the “law” in place…what reason did they have to stop them from dancing? Were they bored because they were only Park Police and wanted to get some action that day? Or was it because they can’t dance so no one else should? Still doesn’t make sense to me why they felt it necessary to stop people from dancing…blows my mind.

  • Steve says:

    I think because of the open arena and dance hall like setting people just danced – but when asked to stop and they did not stop I think the police just felt like their egos were deflated. So in my humble opinion they just went on a rampage causing more trouble and violence ensuring job security.

  • Steve says:

    In the CFR law it does not include CASUAL park users or users not wanting to prosper or start a gathering.

    I believe it is aginst the law in some Mid East countries that prohibit public affection.

  • asdf says:

    The place has special rules, like many other places. For example, at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, you’re not allowed to talk during the changing of guards. There IS such thing as abuse of freedoms. These people were looking for trouble, and yes, the DID get warned first, but continued to not follow the rules. In 1st grade, I wasn’t allowed to randomly start dancing in the middle of class. Was this a violation of my freedoms? Yeah, if you want to stretch it that far. But if you’re reasonable you’ll just listen to the rules. And the officer did state what rule they were breaking, MULTIPLE times. Just because it’s far-fetched doesn’t mean it doesn’t apply to you.

Leave a Reply

Quantcast