How Edward Hopper “Storyboarded” His Iconic Painting Nighthawks

≡ Category: Art |Leave a Comment

Edward Hopper’s Nighthawks (1942) doesn’t just evoke a certain stripe of mid-century, after-hours, big-city American loneliness; it has more or less come to stand for the feeling itself.

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A Sneak Preview of Haruki Murakami’s Forthcoming Illustrated Novel, The Strange Library

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Quick note: If you just finished reading Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, and if you’re now hankering for some more Murakami, you won’t have to wait very long. In December, his next book, a 96 page novella called The Strange Library, will be published by Knopf.

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Henri Matisse Illustrates Baudelaire’s Censored Poetry Collection, Les Fleurs du Mal

≡ Category: Art, Poetry |1 Comment

We previously featured Henri Matisse’s illustrations for a 1935 edition of James Joyce’s Ulysses. If the Odyssey-themed etchings he did for that book surprised you, have a look at his illustrations for Charles Baudelaire’s poetry collection Les Fleurs du mal, first published in 1857. According to Henri-Matisse.

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Winston Churchill’s Paintings: Great Statesman, Surprisingly Good Artist

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Winston Churchill is one of those colossal figures who readily qualifies for that unfashionable moniker of The Great Man of History. This was a guy who warned of Hitler’s threat long before it seemed polite to do so.

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The Guggenheim Puts 109 Free Modern Art Books Online

≡ Category: Art, Books |2 Comments

Back in January, 2012, we mentioned that the Guggenheim (the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed modern art museum in NYC) had put 65 art catalogues on the web, all free of charge.
We’re happy to report that, between then and now, the number of free texts has grown to 109.

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Partisan Review Now Free Online: Read All 70 Years of the Preeminent Literary Journal (1934-2003)

≡ Category: Archives, Art, Literature, Magazines, Poetry, Politics |1 Comment

Founded by William Phillips and Philip Rahv in February of 1934, leftist arts and politics magazine Partisan Review came about initially as an alternative to the American Communist Party’s publication, New Masses. While Partisan Review (PR) published many a Marxist writer, its politics diverged sharply from communism with the rise of Stalin.

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Portraits of Vice Presidents with Octopuses on Their Heads — the Ones You’ve Always Wanted To See

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Last year, after parting ways with a punishing, thankless corporate job but before my wife gave birth to my first child, my friend invited me to participate in the From Dusk til Drawn fundraiser at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Santa Barbara. Basically, it involved drawing for 24 straight hours. At that point in my life – i.e.

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Iraqi Artist Turns Saddam Hussein’s Propaganda Music into Pop, Jazz & Lounge-Style Love Songs

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As ISIS carries out its reign of terror in Syria and Iraq, many diplomats probably wouldn’t mind rolling the calendar back to 2003 — to what now look like simpler times.

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Dripped: An Animated Tribute to Jackson Pollock’s Signature Painting Technique

≡ Category: Animation, Art |Leave a Comment

To make an exciting movie, do you really need much more than an art thief and his capers? With Dripped, animator Léo Verrier sees that can’t-miss premise and raises it in an exploration of art history.

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The Art of Swimming, 1587: A Manual with Woodcut Illustrations

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As the late great Robert Shaw remarked in Jaws, “here’s to swimmin’ with bow-legged women.”
Or failing that, an extremely bow-legged man, as featured in Sir Everard Digby’s 1587 treatise-cum-manual, De Arte Natandi (The Art of Swimming). Hubba hubba, who needs trunks?
There were no pools at the time.

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