Salvador Dalí Creates a Chilling Anti-Venereal Disease Poster During World War II

≡ Category: Art, History, Life, Psychology |Leave a Comment

As a New York City subway rider, I am constantly exposed to public health posters. More often than not these feature a photo of a wholesome-looking teen whose sober expression is meant to convey hindsight regret at having taken up drugs, dropped out of school, or foregone condoms. They’re well intended, but boring.

[...]

The Art of Structured Procrastination

≡ Category: Life, Philosophy, Psychology |3 Comments

If you’re one of our philosophically-minded readers, you’re perhaps already familiar with Stanford professor John Perry. He’s one of the two hosts of the Philosophy Talk radio show that airs on dozens of public radio stations across the US. (Listen to a recent show here.

[...]

Steven Pinker Uses Theories from Evolutionary Biology to Explain Why Academic Writing is So Bad

≡ Category: Education, English Language, Harvard, Psychology |1 Comment

I don’t know about other disciplines, but academic writing in the humanities has become notorious for its jargon-laden wordiness, tangled constructions, and seemingly deliberate vagary and obscurity.

[...]

Carl Jung Writes a Review of Joyce’s Ulysses and Mails It To The Author (1932)

≡ Category: Letters, Literature, Psychology |Leave a Comment

Feelings about James Joyce’s Ulysses tend to fall roughly into one of two camps: the religiously reverent or the exasperated/bored/overwhelmed. As popular examples of the former, we have the many thousand celebrants of Bloomsday—June 16th, the date on which the novel is set in 1904.

[...]

The Famous Letter Where Freud Breaks His Relationship with Jung (1913)

≡ Category: Letters, Psychology |Leave a Comment

Freud and Jung. Jung and Freud. History has closely associated these two who did so much examination of the mind in early 20th-century Europe, but the simple connection of their names belies a much more complicated relationship between the men themselves.

[...]

Sigmund Freud Appears in Rare, Surviving Video & Audio Recorded During the 1930s

≡ Category: History, Psychology |Leave a Comment

What, I wonder, would Sigmund Freud have made of Hannibal Lector? The fictional psychoanalyst, so sophisticated and in control, moonlighting as a bloodthirsty cannibal… a perfectly grim rejoinder to Freud’s ideas about humankind’s perpetual discontent with the painful repression of our darkest, most antisocial drives.

[...]

How a Young Sigmund Freud Researched & Got Addicted to Cocaine, the New “Miracle Drug,” in 1894

≡ Category: Psychology, Science |2 Comments

As David Bowie had his cocaine period, so too did Sigmund Freud, beginning in 1894 and lasting at least two years.

[...]

Michel Foucault and Alain Badiou Discuss “Philosophy and Psychology” on French TV (1965)

≡ Category: Philosophy, Psychology |Leave a Comment

If subtitles don’t play automatically, please click the “CC” button at the bottom of each video.
When Sigmund Freud died in 1939, the year Hitler invaded Poland, W.H. Auden wrote a eulogy in verse and remarked “We are all Freudians now.” One might have said something similar of Michel Foucault after his death in 1984.

[...]

Aldous Huxley, Psychedelics Enthusiast, Lectures About “the Visionary Experience” at MIT (1962)

≡ Category: Literature, Psychology |8 Comments

Today, those who get “turned on” to Aldous Huxley (as they might have said back in the 1960s) get it through his books: the dystopian novel Brave New World, usually, or perhaps the mescaline memoir The Doors of Perception.

[...]

How To Think Like a Psychologist: A Free Online Course from Stanford

≡ Category: Online Courses, Psychology |2 Comments

In early January, we brought you a set of 15 tips to help you stick to your New Year’s resolutions, straight from The Willpower Instinct, a bestselling book by Dr. Kelly McGonigal. Today, we’re highlighting a course that McGonigal organized for Stanford’s Continuing Studies Program, entitled How To Think Like a Psychologist.

[...]

Keep Looking »
Quantcast