How Walking Fosters Creativity: Stanford Researchers Confirm What Philosophers and Writers Have Always Known

≡ Category: Creativity, Life, Literature, Psychology |5 Comments

Image via Diego Sevilla Ruiz
A certain Zen proverb goes something like this: “A five year old can understand it, but an 80 year old cannot do it.” The subject of this riddle-like saying has been described as “mindfulness”—or being absorbed in the moment, free from routine mental habits.


Animated Introductions to Three Sociologists: Durkheim, Weber & Adorno

≡ Category: Economics, Education, Philosophy, Politics, Psychology |5 Comments

Is sociology an art or a science? Is it philosophy? Social psychology? Economics and political theory? Surveying the great sociologists since the mid-19th century, one would have to answer “yes” to all of these questions.


Watch the New Trailer for the Stanford Prison Experiment Film, Soon in Theaters Near You

≡ Category: Psychology |2 Comments

In 1971, Stanford psychology professor Philip Zimbardo undertook a study to determine whether situations determine behavior or whether a person’s disposition leads to behavior regardless of their situation.


John Cleese Explores the Health Benefits of Laughter

≡ Category: Comedy, Health, Psychology |Leave a Comment

If you live in a big city like Los Angeles or San Francisco, you’ll discover that there are just a bewildering variety of yoga styles out there – there’s Ashtanga Yoga if you want a real work out, there’s Yin Yoga if you want to chill out and there’s Bikram Hot Yoga if you want heat stroke. Add to this list Laughter Yoga.


The Psychology of Blame: Another Animated Lesson That Can Make You a Better Person

≡ Category: Psychology |2 Comments

The last time we checked in with Dr. Brené Brown, a research professor at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work, we learned all about the difference between sympathy and empathy, and why empathy is much more meaningful in the end.


Sigmund Freud’s Psychoanalytic Drawings Show How He First Visualized the Ego, Superego, Id & More

≡ Category: History, Psychology, Science |1 Comment

It’s easy to think we know all there is to know about Sigmund Freud. His name, after all, has become an adjective, a sure sign that someone’s legacy has embedded itself in the cultural consciousness.


The Keys to Happiness: The Emerging Science and the Upcoming MOOC by Raj Raghunathan

≡ Category: Life, MOOCs, Online Courses, Psychology |2 Comments

Psychology has made many advances in the past few decades, notably in cognitive science, neuroscience, and behavioral psychology.


All You Need is Love: The Keys to Happiness Revealed by a 75-Year Harvard Study

≡ Category: Health, Life, Psychology |Leave a Comment

The latest installment from PBS’ BrainCraft video series introduces us to two scientific studies that teach us a thing or two about what brings us happiness. One set of results comes from Dr. John Gottman’s Family Research Laboratory (a.k.a.


The Origins of Pleasure: Paul Bloom Explains Why We Like Expensive Wines & Original Paintings

≡ Category: Art, Food & Drink, Psychology, Science, TED Talks |Leave a Comment”>

Let’s say you spend a considerable amount of money for a painting by a noted artist. Or maybe you get it for a steal. Either way, the painting hangs prominently in your home, where it is admired by guests and brings you pleasure every time you look at it, which is often.


The Little Albert Experiment: The Perverse 1920 Study That Made a Baby Afraid of Santa Claus & Bunnies

≡ Category: History, Psychology, Science |2 Comments

The field of psychology is very different than it used to be. Nowadays, the American Psychological Association has a code of conduct for experiments that ensures a subject’s confidentiality, consent and general mental well being. In the old days, it wasn’t the case.


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