The History of Europe: 5,000 Years Animated in a Timelapse Map




If you’re an Open Culture old timer, you know the work of EmperorTigerstar–a Youtuber who specializes (to quote myself) “in documenting the unfolding of world historical events by stitching together hundreds of maps into timelapse films”. We’ve previously featured his “map animations” of the U.S. Civil War (1861-1865), World War I (1914-1918), and World War II (1939-1945) and also the History of Rome. This week, the map animator released The History of Europe: Every Year. In ten minutes, he takes us from The Minoan civilization that arose on the Greek island of Crete (3650 to 1400 BC), down to our modern times. About 5,000 years of history gets covered before you can boil a pot of pasta. Enjoy.

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Related Content:

The Rise & Fall of the Romans: Every Year Shown in a Timelapse Map Animation (753 BC -1479 AD)

Animated Map Lets You Watch the Unfolding of Every Day of the U.S. Civil War (1861-1865)

Watch World War I Unfold in a 6 Minute Time-Lapse Film: Every Day From 1914 to 1918

Watch World War II Rage Across Europe in a 7 Minute Time-Lapse Film: Every Day From 1939 to 1945


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