Google Sky, Moon and Mars

Here’s what you get when Google engi­neers put their heads togeth­er with astronomers from large obser­va­to­ries: With Google Sky, “you can search for plan­ets, lis­ten to Earth & Sky pod­casts, watch some beau­ti­ful Hub­ble tele­scope images, or explore his­tor­i­cal maps of the sky from the com­fort of your brows­er.” The prod­uct was rolled out just last week, and you can get more info on the new release from Google’s offi­cial blog.

The new Sky prod­uct sits com­fort­ably along­side Google Moon and Google Mars, which have been around since 2005–2006. Cre­at­ed in con­junc­tion with sci­en­tists at the NASA Ames Research Cen­ter, Google Moon offers a col­lec­tion of lunar maps and charts and delves into the Apol­lo mis­sions. The Mars prod­uct, mean­while, offers some of the most detailed exist­ing maps of the red plan­et.

For more good sci­ence, see our Sci­ence Pod­cast Col­lec­tion here.

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  • Dear Google, Sky, Moon and Mars Blog­gers
    UCLA Exten­sion presents one-day pro­grams on Physics and Astron­o­my in April and May led by promi­nent sci­en­tists and reserchers — Fer­di­nand Coro­ni­ti, Professor/Chair, Depart­ment of Physics and Astron­o­my, UCLA; and Kevin Gra­zier, PhD, Inves­ti­ga­tion Sci­en­tist, Cassi­ni Mis­sion toSat­urn and Titan, Jet Propul­sion Lab­o­ra­to­ry, Cal­tech.

    What’s New in Physics 2008
    Sat­ur­day, April 12, 2008
    9 am to 5 pm
    Fee: $65

    UCLA Cam­pus
    1425 Physics & Astron­o­my Bldg.
    405 Hil­gard Avenue
    Los Ange­les, CA 90024

    Join four promi­nent sci­en­tists as they explore ques­tions and
    issues at the fas­ci­nat­ing fron­tiers of research in mod­ern
    physics, includ­ing:

    -What will the uni­verse look like 150 bil­lion years from now?

    -How did we learn about the com­po­si­tion of the uni­verse?

    -How does the inner ear detect minute mechan­i­cal sig­nals?

    -What is the first step in the pro­cess­ing of audi­to­ry
    infor­ma­tion?

    -Why is Antarc­ti­ca a spe­cial place to per­form physics and
    astron­o­my research?

    -How do accel­er­at­ed elec­trons see what has not been seen before?

    -Can one recre­ate the Big Bang in a lab­o­ra­to­ry?

    From dark mat­ter to the study of high-ener­gy cos­mic par­ti­cles
    to research at the inter­face of physics and neu­ro­phys­i­ol­o­gy,
    research teams in the UCLA Depart­ment of Physics and Astron­o­my are at the fore­front of our explo­ration of the fun­da­men­tal nature of our uni­verse.

    Pro­gram Coor­di­na­tor:
    Fer­di­nand Coro­ni­ti, Professor/Chair, Depart­ment of Physics and
    Astron­o­my, UCLA

    Pro­gram and Speak­ers
    ‑The Dark Side of the Uni­verse: Dark Mat­ter and Dark Ener­gy
    with Alexan­der Kusenko, PhD, Pro­fes­sor, Depart­ment of Physics
    and Astron­o­my, UCLA;

    -Work­ing in Antarc­ti­ca: An Astro­physi­cist’s Jour­ney with David
    Saltzberg, PhD, Pro­fes­sor, Depart­ment of Physics and Astron­o­my,
    UCLA;

    -Bio­physics of Hear­ing with Dolores Bozovic, PhD, Assis­tant
    Pro­fes­sor, Depart­ment of Physics and Astron­o­my, UCLA;

    -Accel­er­a­tor Physics: New Light Sources and Med­ical Imag­ing
    Tech­niques with James Rosen­zweig, PhD, Pro­fes­sor, Depart­ment of
    Physics and Astron­o­my, UCLA.

    UCLA Astron­o­my Home­page Images
    http://www.astro.ucla.edu/graphics/site/rotation/index.shtml
    —–

    New
    Extremophiles to Exo­plan­ets: Life in the Uni­verse

    Sat­ur­day, May 17, 2008
    9 am to 5 pm
    Fee: $65

    UCLA Cam­pus
    147 Dodd Hall
    405 Hil­gard Avenue
    Los Ange­les, CA 90024

    Join four promi­nent sci­en­tists work­ing at the cut­ting edge of their respec­tive fields as they exam­ine the search for life with­in the solar sys­tem and through­out the galaxy.

    Con­sid­er these ques­tions:

    -Could there be life under­neath the icy crust of Jupiter’s
    moon, Europa? Per­haps under the sur­face of Sat­urn’s moon,
    Titan?

    -How is our study of extremophile life forms on Earth affect­ing
    our search for life “out there”?

    -What life forms exist under extreme envi­ron­ments on Earth and
    how do they sur­vive?

    -What fas­ci­nat­ing pos­si­ble abodes for life are being dis­cov­ered
    by NASA’s Spitzer Space Tele­scope?

    -How does the near-dai­ly dis­cov­ery of extra-solar plan­ets
    influ­ence our views of the like­li­hood of extra-solar life?

    Pro­gram Coor­di­na­tor
    Kevin Gra­zier, PhD, Inves­ti­ga­tion Sci­en­tist, Cassi­ni Mis­sion to
    Sat­urn and Titan, Jet Propul­sion Lab­o­ra­to­ry, Cal­tech.

    In addi­tion to his JPL duties, Dr. Gra­zier teach­es sev­er­al
    uni­ver­si­ty astron­o­my cours­es, and has served as a sci­ence
    advi­sor for the Sci-Fi Chan­nel, CNN, and PBS.

    Michelle Thaller, PhD, Research Sci­en­tist, Spitzer Space
    Tele­scope, Cal­tech. Dr. Thaller not only per­forms research
    based upon Spitzer obser­va­tions, she also is a high­ly sought-
    after astro­nom­i­cal out­reach speak­er;

    Ken­neth Neal­son, PhD, Wrigley Pro­fes­sor of Geo­bi­ol­o­gy at USC.
    An expert on extremophile life forms, Dr. Neal­son stud­ies
    organ­isms that live in extreme envi­ron­ments and devel­ops
    tech­niques both for in situ life detec­tion and analy­sis of
    sam­ples returned from Mars in future mis­sions;

    William I. New­man, PhD, Pro­fes­sor in Physics and Astron­o­my,
    Earth, and Space Sci­ences, and Math­e­mat­ics at UCLA. Dr. New­man
    is an expert in plan­e­tary dynam­ics, teach­es astro­bi­ol­o­gy, and
    has writ­ten pro­fes­sion­al pub­li­ca­tions with the late Carl Sagan
    on the plau­si­bil­i­ty of extrater­res­tri­al life.

    Extremophiles
    an organ­ism adampt­ed to liv­ing in con­di­tions of extreme tem­per­a­ture, pres­sure or chem­i­cal con­cen­tra­tion, as in high­ly
    acidic or salty envi­ron­ments. Many extremophiles are uni­cel­lu­lar organ­isms knows as archea.

    Exo­plan­ets
    an extra­so­lar plan­et, or exo­plan­et, is a plan­et beyond the Solar Sys­tem. As of Decem­ber 2007, 270 exo­plan­ets have been
    detect­ed. The vast major­i­ty were detect­ed through var­i­ous indi­rect meth­ods rather than actu­al imag­ing. Most of them are mas­sive giant plan­ets like­ly to resem­ble Jupiter.

    Vis­it http://www.uclaextension.edu or call 310–825-7093.

  • Anonymous says:

    en español

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