Pink Floyd: Live at Pompeii Streaming Free on YouTube Today Only




Pink Floyd is helping you get through the coronavirus by streaming free concert films on YouTube. First came Pulse, a 22-song set from the 1994 Division Bell tour. Now comes Pink Floyd: Live at Pompeii, a 1972 concert film featuring the band performing within the ancient Roman amphitheatre at Pompeii. It’s a classic. Watch it above. And learn more about the film in our prior post here.

Note: The film is only streaming free on YouTube for 24 hours. So watch it while you can. Once the film goes dark, you can watch outtakes here.

If you would like to get Open Culture post’s via email, please sign up for our free email newsletter here.

And if you would like to support the mission of Open Culture, consider making a donation to our site. It’s hard to rely 100% on ads, and your contributions will help us continue providing the best cultural and educational materials to learners everywhere. You can contribute through PayPal, Patreon, Venmo (@openculture) and Crypto. Thanks for your support!

Related Content:

Radiohead Will Stream Concerts Free Online Until the Pandemic Comes to an End

Pink Floyd Streaming Free Classic Concert Films, Starting with 1994’s Pulse, the First Live Performance of Dark Side of the Moon in Full

Pink Floyd Films a Concert in an Empty Auditorium, Still Trying to Break Into the U.S. Charts (1970)

The Dark Side of the Moon Project: Watch the First of an 8-Part Video Essay on Pink Floyd’s Classic Album

Watch Pink Floyd Play Live Amidst the Ruins of Pompeii in 1971 … and David Gilmour Does It Again in 2016


by | Permalink | Comments (3) |

Support Open Culture

We’re hoping to rely on our loyal readers rather than erratic ads. To support Open Culture’s educational mission, please consider making a donation. We accept PayPal, Venmo (@openculture), Patreon and Crypto! Please find all options here. We thank you!

Comments (3)
You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

Leave a Reply

Quantcast
Open Culture was founded by Dan Colman.