Discover the Creative, New Philosophy Podcast Hi-Phi Nation: The First Story-Driven Show About Philosophy

Let me call your attention to a new and quite different philosophy podcast. Created by Barry Lam (Associate Professor of Philosophy at Vassar College), Hi-Phi Nation is a philosophy podcast "that turns stories into ideas." Consider it "the first sound and story-driven show about philosophy, bringing together narrative storytelling, investigative journalism, and soundtracking."

Above you can watch a trailer that introduces Hi-Phi Nation, which is now available on iTunes, Google Play, Soundcloud and this website. Below, hear Episode 9 of Season 1, called "The Ashes of Truth." Among other things, it features filmmaker Errol Morris.

The first season of Hi-Phi Nation has been made possible by the National Endowment for the Humanities, The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, the Humanities-Writ Large Fellowship, and other institutions. Learn more about the show by reading these write-ups by Vassar and Princeton.

Follow Open Culture on Facebook and Twitter and share intelligent media with your friends. Or better yet, sign up for our daily email and get a daily dose of Open Culture in your inbox. 

If you'd like to support Open Culture and our mission, please consider making a donation to our site. It's hard to rely 100% on ads, and your contributions will help us provide the best free cultural and educational materials.

Related Content:

Free Online Philosophy Courses

Learn Islamic & Indian Philosophy with 107 Episodes of the History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps Podcast

The History of Philosophy … Without Any Gaps

A History of Philosophy in 81 Video Lectures: From Ancient Greece to Modern Times 

The History of Philosophy Visualized

Alec Baldwin Has a Podcast: Hear His Intimate Interviews with Patti Smith, Thom Yorke, Jerry Seinfeld, Ira Glass, Amy Schumer & More

It somehow escaped me. Alec Baldwin has a podcast. With 133 episodes in its archive, Here’s The Thing with Alec Baldwin  (Web - iTunes - Feeds) features "intimate and honest conversations" with "artists, policy makers and performers – to hear their stories, what inspires their creations, what decisions changed their careers, and what relationships influenced their work." Below, we've embedded his recent conversation with Patti Smith. It's quite good. But there are so many others worth a mention. Let me rattle off a quick list: REM's Michael Stipe, Viggo Mortensen, Michael Pollan, Amy Schumer and Judd Apatow, William Friedkin, Paul Simon, Ira Glass, Jerry Seinfeld, David Simon, Radiohead's Thom Yorke, Lena Dunham, Peter Frampton, David Letterman, Carol BurnettKristen Wiig, SNL's Lorne Michaels, and Chris Rock.

Click the links to stream each interview, and don't miss Baldwin's new memoir, NeverthelessHe happens to narrate the audiobook version, which you can download for free if you sign up for Audible.com's 30-day free trial. We have info on that here.

Follow Open Culture on Facebook and Twitter and share intelligent media with your friends. Or better yet, sign up for our daily email and get a daily dose of Open Culture in your inbox. 

If you'd like to support Open Culture and our mission, please consider making a donation to our site. It's hard to rely 100% on ads, and your contributions will help us provide the best free cultural and educational materials.

An Epic Retelling of the Great Chinese Novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms: 110 Free Episodes and Counting

Romance of the Three Kingdoms is considered one of the Four Great Classical Novels of Chinese literature, and its literary influence in East Asia rivals that of Shakespeare in the English speaking world. "Written 600 years ago," writes the BBC, "it is an historical novel that tells the story of a tumultuous period in Chinese history, the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD. Partly historical and partly legend, it recounts the fighting and scheming of the feudal lords and the three states which came to power as the Han Dynasty collapsed."

And now the ancient meets the modern...

If you listen to the Romance of the Three Kingdoms podcast, you can hear John Zhu's attempt to retell this epic tale and make it accessible to a Western audience. The first 110 episodes are available on YouTube, the web, and iTunes--with at least another 10 to come. Quite a feat. Have a listen.

To learn more about Romance of the Three Kingdoms, listen to this episode of the BBC's In Our Time.

Follow Open Culture on Facebook and Twitter and share intelligent media with your friends. Or better yet, sign up for our daily email and get a daily dose of Open Culture in your inbox. 

If you'd like to support Open Culture and our mission, please consider making a donation to our site. It's hard to rely 100% on ads, and your contributions will help us provide the best free cultural and educational materials.

via metafilter

Related Content:

900 Free Audio Books: Download Great Books for Free

The History of Rome in 179 Podcasts

The History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps Podcast, Now at 239 Episodes, Expands into Eastern Philosophy

S-Town: The Podcast That Will Help You Binge-Listen Your Way Through This Week

Last week, the folks behind Serial and This American Life, teamed up to release S-Town (short for Shittown), a seven-episode/seven-hour podcast which I devoured in three days flat. I don't want to give any spoilers. So let me give you just the text that promotes the podcast on iTunes, and then suggest you start listening:

John despises his Alabama town and decides to do something about it. He asks a reporter to investigate the son of a wealthy family who's allegedly been bragging that he got away with murder. But then someone else ends up dead, sparking a nasty feud, a hunt for hidden treasure, and an unearthing of the mysteries of one man's life.

Find episodes on iTunes, Stitcher, RSS feed, Radio Public, or the web.

Follow Open Culture on Facebook and Twitter and share intelligent media with your friends. Or better yet, sign up for our daily email and get a daily dose of Open Culture in your inbox. 

If you'd like to support Open Culture and our mission, please consider making a donation to our site. It's hard to rely 100% on ads, and your contributions will help us provide the best free cultural and educational materials.

Listen to Presidential, The Washington Post’s Podcast Exploring Each & Every U.S. President

A quick heads up on President's Day: The Washington Post presents Presidential, a podcast that explores how "each American president reached office, made decisions, handled crises and redefined the role of commander-in-chief." Naturally, it starts with George Washington. Hear that episode below.

Presidential is hosted by WashPo editor Lillian Cunningham and features Pulitzer Prize-winning historians like David McCullough and journalists like Bob Woodward. Right now you can get all 45 episodes (each about 30-50 minutes long) on iTunes, Soundcloud and Stitcher.

Follow Open Culture on Facebook and Twitter and share intelligent media with your friends. Or better yet, sign up for our daily email and get a daily dose of Open Culture in your inbox. 

If you'd like to support Open Culture and our mission, please consider making a donation to our site. It's hard to rely 100% on ads, and your contributions will help us provide the best free cultural and educational materials.

Related Content:

Free Online History Courses

Watch Online Every Presidential Debate Since 1960–and Revisit America’s Saner Political Days

John Green’s Crash Course in U.S. History: From Colonialism to Obama in 47 Videos

The History of the World in 46 Lectures From Columbia University

An Immersive Audio Tour of the East Village’s Famed Poetry Scene, Narrated by Jim Jarmusch

Allen_ginsberg_erads howl

Image by Michiel Hendryckx, via Wikimedia Commons

A peek at the photos on a realtor’s listing for a New York City one bedroom apartment formerly occupied by Beat poet Allen Ginsberg is a dispiriting reminder of how much the East Village has changed.

And that listing is over six years old!

Daniel Maurer, the editor of Bedford + Bowery, and a Ginsberg fan whom history has compelled to take over a portion of his hero’s formerly sprawling digs, wrote amusingly of shoddy renovations and his upstairs neighbor, punk rock icon Richard Hell:

Orlovsky’s name is still on the mailbox – which is just about the only thing still around from his day. After his death, the place was gut renovated with luxurious modern amenities like a mini fridge that comes up to mid-thigh and a stove that’s so tiny and ineffectual I just use it for cookbook storage. Soon after I moved in I took a trip to Ikea and recognized my kitchen cabinets there.

That’s why I was amused to read a piece in the Wall Street Journal … in which my upstairs neighbor, Richard Hell, talked about his rent-stabilized two-bedroom apartment and its “funkiness that you don’t find in Manhattan much anymore.”

Hell describes his “worn unvarnished wood floors that groan when you walk on them, cracks in the plaster walls, sagging original moldings.” That’s exactly what I was looking for in an apartment two years ago.

Maurer is far from alone in the desire to edge closer to a bygone cultural moment. Radio producer Pejk Malinovski spent three years crafting Passing Stranger, a site-specific audio tour of the East Village poetry scene, below.

A Dane who relocated to New York in 2003, Malinovski was intrigued by the scene-related anecdotes of his friend, poet Ron Padgett, who pointed out his former haunts on strolls about the neighborhood. His interest piqued, Malinovski immersed himself in Daniel Kane’s All Poets Welcome, The Lower East Side Poetry Scene in the 1960’s, another history that comes fortified with archival audio clips.

Filmmaker Jim Jarmusch, a longtime Lower East Side resident who studied with poet Kenneth Koch in his youth, was tapped to provide the audio tour’s narration, with music compliments of composer John Zorn, the artistic director of The Stone, an experimental East Village performance space. Below, Jarmusch explains what attracted him to the project:

No matter if geographic constraints prevent you from downloading Malinovski’s tour for a two mile, 90 minute amble around the much-changed East Village. In some ways, the virtual tour is better. Rather than trying to take it all in in a single, pre-plotted session, you're free to wander at will, enjoying such interactive features as maps and photos, in addition to interviews, readings, and reminiscences.

The 10th stop on the tour deposits you across the street from 437 East 12th Street, Ginsberg’s aforementioned former residence, on the steps of a church that no longer exists. Mary Help of Christians Roman Catholic Church was demolished shortly after Passing Stranger hit the streets, but its memory lives on thanks to its celebrated appearance in Ginsberg’s work:

Fourth Floor, Dawn, Up All Night Writing Letters

Pigeons shake their wings on the copper church roof 

out my window across the street, a bird perched on the cross 

surveys the city's blue-grey clouds. Larry Rivers 

'll come at 10 AM and take my picture. I'm taking 

your picture, pigeons. I'm writing you down, Dawn. 

I'm immortalizing your exhaust, Avenue A bus. 

O Thought, now you'll have to think the same thing forever!

- Allen Ginsberg, New York, June 7, 1980

Ginsberg himself is brought to vivid life by his secretary and fellow poet, Bob Rosenthal, who recalls how visitors would call up from the street, then wait for Ginsberg to toss down keys, wrapped in a dirty sock. He also name checks Mr. Buongiorno, the 437 East 12th St neighbor who served as Mary Help of Christians’ bell ringer.

You can hear those bells in the background of your Passing Stranger tour, though producer Malinovski uses ambient sound sparingly, to avoid overwhelming those using the tour on the noisy streets of the actual East Village.

You can download the full walking tour of Passing Stranger---named for Walt Whitman’s opening salutation in “To a Stranger”---here.

Explore Passing Stranger’s trivia-filled interactive website---featuring audio from Amiri Baraka, Hettie Jones, Eileen Myles, and Jack Kerouac, among others---here.

Poems included on the Passing Stranger audio tour of the East Village, in order of appearance:

Kenneth Koch, “To my Audience” (excerpt)

Frank O'Hara, Ode to Joy (To hell with it) (excerpt)

Ted Berrrigan "Dear Margie, Hello"

Ron Padgett “Poema del City from Toujours l’amour"

Walt Whitman, “To a Stranger”

Taylor Mead, “Motorcycles”

Bernadette Mayor, “Sonnet (You jerk, you didn't call me up)”

Diane Di Prima, “Revolutionary Letters” (excerpt)

Galway Kinnell, “The Avenue Bearing the Initial of Christ” (excerpt)

Miquel Piñero, “A Lower East Side Poem” (excerpt)

Jack Kerouac, “American Haiku” (excerpt)

Bill Berkson / Frank O'Hara, “Song Heard Around St. Bridget’s"

John Ashbery, “Just Walking Around, from A Wave”

Joe Brainard, “I Remember” (excerpt)

Alice Notley, “10 Best Comic Books”

WH Auden, “September 1, 1939” (excerpt)

Anne Waldman, “Fast Speaking Woman” (excerpt)

Lewis Warsh, “Eye Contact” (excerpt)

Dick Gallup / Ted Berrigan, “80th Congress”

Abraham Lincoln, “My Childhood-Home I See Again” (excerpt)

Leroi Jones, “Bang, bang, outishly” (excerpt)

Hettie Jones, “Ode to My Kitchen Sink”

Brenda Coultas, “A Handmade Museum” (excerpt)

ee cummings, ”i was sitting in mcsorley’s…”

Related Content:

Rare Footage of Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac & Other Beats Hanging Out in the East Village (1959)

Hear Allen Ginsberg Teach “Literary History of the Beats”: Audio Lectures from His 1977 & 1981 Naropa Courses

Iggy Pop Conducts a Tour of New York’s Lower East Side, Circa 1993

Ayun Halliday is an author, illustrator, theater maker and Chief Primatologist of the East Village Inky zine.  Her play Zamboni Godot is opening in New York City in March 2017. Follow her @AyunHalliday.

The History of Literature Podcast Takes You on a Literary Journey: From Ancient Epics to Contemporary Classics

LOGO-COVERS

Even before you start on a journey through the history of literature, you know some of the stops you'll make on the way: the Epic of Gilgamesh, the Bible, Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, Greek tragedy, Shakespeare, Joyce. And so it comes as no surprise that Jacke Wilson, creator and host of the History of Literature podcast (from ancient epics to contemporary classics - Android - RSS), has so far devoted whole episodes, and often more than one, to each of them. A self-described "amateur scholar," Wilson aims with this show, which he launched last October, to take "a fresh look at some of the most compelling examples of creative genius the world has ever known."

Wilson also addresses questions like "How did literature develop? What forms has it taken? And what can we learn from engaging with these works today?" And yet he asks this rhetorical one in The History of Literature's very first episode"Is it just me, or is literature dying?" The also self-described "wildly unqualified host" admits that he at first tried to create a straightforward, straight-faced march through literary history, but found the result staid and lifeless. And so he loosened up, allowing in not just more of his personality but more of his doubts about the very literary enterprise in the 21st century.

Given that we get so much of our knowledge, human interaction, and pure wordcraft on the internet today, laments Wilson, what remains for novels, stories, poetry, and drama to provide us? As a History of Literature listener, I personally see things differently. The fact that we now have such abundant outlets from which to receive all those other things may strip literature of some of the relevance it once held by default, but it also lifts from literature a considerable burden. Just as the development of photography freed painting from the obligation to ever more faithfully represent reality, literature can now find forms and subjects better suited to the artistic experience that it, and only it, can deliver.

Jorge Luis Borges counts as only one of the writers who grasped the unexplored potential of literature, and Wilson uses one of the occasional episodes that breaks from the linearity of history to discuss the "Garden of Forking Paths" author's thoughts on the meaning of life. He recorded it (listen above) in response to two deaths: that of "Fifth Beatle" George Martin, and even more so that of his uncle. Other relatable parts of Wilson's life come into play in other conversations about writers both ancient and modern, such as the conversation about the works of Graham Greene and whether he can still get as much out of them as he did during his youthful traveling days. Literature, after all, may have no greater value than that it gets us asking questions — a value The History of Literature demonstrates in every episode. 

Related Content:

What Are Literature, Philosophy & History For? Alain de Botton Explains with Monty Python-Style Videos

A Crash Course in English Literature: A New Video Series by Best-Selling Author John Green

Entitled Opinions, the “Life and Literature” Podcast That Refuses to Dumb Things Down

The Dead Authors Podcast: H.G. Wells Comically Revives Literary Greats with His Time Machine

The History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps Podcast, Now at 239 Episodes, Expands into Eastern Philosophy

The Complete History of the World (and Human Creativity) in 100 Objects

78 Free Online History Courses: From Ancient Greece to The Modern World

55 Free Online Literature Courses: From Dante and Milton to Kerouac and Tolkien

Based in Seoul, Colin Marshall writes and broadcasts on cities and culture. He’s at work on a book about Los Angeles, A Los Angeles Primer, the video series The City in Cinema, the crowdfunded journalism project Where Is the City of the Future?, and the Los Angeles Review of Books’ Korea Blog. Follow him on Twitter at @colinmarshall or on Facebook.

More in this category... »
Quantcast