About Us

What is Open Culture’s Mission?

Open Culture brings together high-quality cultural & educational media for the worldwide lifelong learning community. Web 2.0 has given us great amounts of intelligent audio and video. It’s all free. It’s all enriching. But it’s also scattered across the web, and not easy to find. Our whole mission is to centralize this content, curate it, and give you access to this high quality content whenever and wherever you want it. Free audio books, free online courses, free movies, free language lessons, free ebooks and other enriching content — it’s all here. Open Culture was founded in 2006. You can follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Google Plus.

Who is Behind Open Culture?

Dan Colman, the lead editor, is the Director & Associate Dean of Stanford’s Continuing Studies Program. Before that, he served as the Managing Director of AllLearn, an e-learning consortium owned by Stanford, Oxford and Yale, and as the Director of Business Development and Editorial Manager at About.com. He received his PhD and MA from Stanford, and his BA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The common thread running through his career is his interest in bringing relevant, perspective-changing information to large audiences, often with the help of the internet. Get his full bio here. You can reach Dan at mail@openculture.com.

Colin Marshall hosts and produces Notebook on Cities and Culture and writes for Open Culture regularly.

Josh Jones received his PhD in English at Fordham University and is a co-founder and former managing editor of Guernica / A Magazine of Arts and Politics.

Mike Springer, a journalist living in Cambridge, Massachusetts, writes daily for Open Culture.

Ayun Halliday is a writer and actor. She is best known as the author and illustrator of the long-running zine The East Village Inky.

Eric Oberle provides very generous technical support for the site. Without him, you would be getting 404s instead of regular doses of intelligent media.

Matthias Rascher teaches English and History at a High School in northern Bavaria, Germany. In his free time he scours the web for good links and posts the best finds on Twitter.

Kate Rix writes about k-12 instruction and higher education on a regular basis. Visit more of her work here.

Ilia Blinderman is a Montreal-based culture and science writer. Follow him at @iliablinderman, or read more of his writing at the Huffington Post.

Jonathan Crow is a Los Angeles-based writer and filmmaker whose work has appeared in Yahoo!, The Hollywood Reporter, and other publications. You can follow him at @jonccrow.

Is the Site Affiliated with Stanford University?

This site is not associated with Stanford. The ideas/views expressed here belong to Dan, or others. But, in all cases, they are private ones.

How Can I Contact Open Culture?

Feel free to drop us a line at mail@openculture.com.

Can I Advertise on Open Culture?

Yes. You can immediately place ads on Open Culture by using Google’s Adwords platform. This will give you the ability to target the whole site or specific pages. Find directions on how to target our site here.

Do You Have a Copyright Policy?

Yes and you can find it here.

Do You Have a Privacy Policy?

Yes, read all about it here.

Can I Recommend Materials to List on Open Culture?

Yes. If you would like us to add links to relevant parts of our site, you can suggest materials/links via email and we will be happy to review them. Please read over our editorial guidelines and then let us know where you think your material should be listed, and try to provide all of the information that will help us list your material. For example, if you want us to include a link in one of our podcast directories, please look at the appropriate directory and include all of the information that we typically include in our entries.

Do The Courses Featured Here Give University Credit?

First and foremost, the MOOCs/Online courses appearing on this page sometimes offer students “statements of accomplishment” or “certificates of completion” if they successfully complete a given course. However, most traditional universities won’t give students credit for taking theses online courses, and students typically can’t use these courses as a way to satisfy requirements for a degree. It’s conceivable that some schools will give credit for these classes, but you would really need to check with the registar’s office at your institution.

Second, we should point out (in case it’s not clear) that Open Culture is not the builder/creator of these courses. Our site simply highlights MOOCs/Online Courses created by other educational ventures. You can get more information by reading our MOOC FAQ.


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