The Best of the Culture Web. Open Culture Beat No. 10

What cultural goodies did we tweet (and re-tweet) on our Twitter stream in recent days? Here are the highlights. Follow us on Twitter at @openculture to get the rest, or Like us on Facebook. We’ll keep you plugged into quality culture every day.

  • Nobel Prize for Literature Goes to Tomas Tranströmer: Read article. Read his poems: After a Death and Outskirts. Tranströmer reads his poem Schubertiana above.
  • Niels Bohr Dissolves Two Nobel Prize Medals. Fascinating story about what happened when the Nazis overtook Copenhagen in 1940. The article.
  • When Kerouac and Kesey Met in 1964. The story told by their literary agent.
  • The Seven Greatest Stories from Esquire. Stories by Norman Mailer, Gay Talese, Tom Wolfe and beyond.
  • Flannery O’Connor Reads “A Good Man is Hard to Find.” Vanderbilt University, 1959. Audio.
  • Miles Davis and John Lennon Playing Basketball in 1971. Watch around 5:00 minute mark. Video.
  • Radio Mozart: All Mozart, All the Time. Online. Scroll down page, and click “Ecouter la radio.” Audio.
  • Nikon’s Small World Photomicrography Competition. 32 images of anything and everything visible under a microscope. Images.
  • The 1943 Disney Employee Handbook Digitized. How employees learned the ropes.
  • Jon Stewart Explains How The Daily Show is Made. Video courtesy of Rolling Stone. Watch.
  • “Marlon I Respect You Enormously.” Francis Ford Coppola’s 1973 letter to Marlon Brando.
  • Björk’s New Album ‘Biophilia.’ Stream it free online for a limited time.
  • The Films of Roman Polanski:A four-part retrospective.
  • Steven Pinker Interviewed by Sam Harris. Talk about his new book, The Better Angels of Our Nature: The Decline of Violence in History and Its Causes. Read interview here.
  • Ten Seconds from Every Top 100 Song 1956-1959. Courtesy of WFMU. Audio.
  • Bonnie and Clyde Death Scene. Footage from 1934. Video.
  • Peter Gabriel Performs 1980s Classics with an Orchestra. Listen to three tracks.
  • Audio Slideshow of the Willem de Kooning Retrospective at MOMA. Courtesy of The New Yorker. 3 minutes.
  • Christopher Hitchens on George Orwell’s 1984. Audio recorded in 2009. Listen. (Free audio version of the novel here.)
  • Jack White Records Lost Hank Williams Song. Found in his notebooks after his death. Listen.
  • Finding Fellini’s La Dolce Vita in Today’s Rome. You just need to know where to look for it.
  • Brian Wilson Interviewed in Studio Q. Talks about The Beach Boys, the creative process, drugs, and his struggle with mental illness. Video.
  • Kanji Characters: Learn to Draw Characters in Japanese. Courtesy of Emory University. iTunes Video. Added to our collection Learn Languages for Free.

Sources: @philosophybites, @opedr@elizabethkarr, @coudal@stevesilberman@brainpicker, @dangermindsblog,  @webacion, @matthiasrascher,

25 Great Culture Links: Open Culture Beat No. 9

What cultural goodies did we tweet (and re-tweet) on our Twitter stream in recent days? Here are the highlights. Follow us on Twitter at @openculture to get the rest, or Like us on Facebook. We’ll keep you plugged into quality culture every day.

  • Haruki Murakami’s New Story, “Town of Cats.” Published in last week’s New Yorker.
  • 10 Things Henri Cartier-Bresson Can Teach You About Street Photography. Here it goes.
  • Paul Simon Performs ‘Sound of Silence.’ A somber and fitting performance at the 9/11 Memorial.
  • Read J.D. Salinger’s Words Before They Disappear. Backstory here. Actual Salinger letter here.
  • Listen to a Free Audiobook of The 9/11 Commission Report. Plus other related materials. Audio.
  • Agatha Christie and Her Surf Board, 1922. Groovy photo.
  • Understanding Dostoyevsky Courtesy of Woody Allen: It’s all about existentialism.
  • Hubble Captures Time-Lapse Videos Of Stars Being Born. Mind-blowing NASA video.
  • Stream Music Courtesy of the David Lynch Foundation. Listen to original music by Alanis Morissette, Tom Waits, Dave Stewart, etc.
  • Joan Didion’s “Some Dreamers of the Golden Dream.” Now online.
  • Salvador Dali’s Vogue Covers. Produced mostly in the 1930s and 40s.
  • Jonathan Lethem Introduces Lost Rolling Stone Interview with Clint Eastwood. Read it here.
  • Ernest Hemingway’s Early Life in Letters. Vintage photos.
  • Photo of Katharine Hepburn after the Hurricane of 1938. Click images to enlarge.
  • Frank Zappa Speaks Out for Dental Hygiene. A humorous public service announcement circa 1981.
  • Louis CK Pays Tribute to George Carlin at The New York Public Library. A little NSFW, of course!
  • Malcolm Gladwell: How Different are Dogfighting and Football? His latest in The New Yorker. Text.
  • Letter of Recommendation Written for 16 Year Old Orson Welles. “He’s talented to the point of genius.”
  • Hannah Arendt’s Challenge to Adolf Eichmann. Judith Butler writes in The Guardian
  • The Best Muppet Show Beatles Covers. Fun.
  • Amazing Shot of the Surface of Mars. Captured by the Rover Opportunity on Aug 9.
  • 30 Amazing Stanley Kubrick Cinemagraphs. Photos.
  • Leonardo Mural in Florence, a Lost Masterpiece, May Soon Be Revealed. The story
  • Space Oddity, A Children’s Book Inspired By David Bowie’s Classic Song. Image collection here.
  • Steven Soderbergh to Leave Hollywood. Confirms plans to become a painter.
  • A History of Ireland in 100 Objects. Starts with Mesolithic Fish Trap, ca. 5000BC

Sources: @matthiasrascher,  @kottke,  @coudal,  @craigmod,  @thebookslut,  @thedailyMUBI, @brainpicker, @Criterion,  @ebertchicago

25 Great Culture Links: Open Culture Beat No. 8

What cultural goodies did we tweet (and re-tweet) on our Twitter stream during the past week? Here are the highlights. Follow us on Twitter at @openculture to get the rest, or Like us on Facebook. We’ll keep you plugged into mind-expanding culture every day.

  • Albert Camus Killed by the KGB? For criticizing the Soviet Union?
  • Telegram Sent by Noel Coward to Agatha Christie in 1957. Found by furniture restorer in her old bureau.
  • Early Hitchcock Film Found In New Zealand. Article here. Watch Hitchcock films online here.
  • Charles Mingus: The jazz legend on how to toilet train your cat.
  • Why I Write (1946): George Orwell details his personal journey to becoming a writer. (Get Orwell’s 1984 & Animal Farm in text & audio here.)
  • An American Girl in Italy: Ruth Orkin’s iconic photo 60 years later. Stoic independence or sheer vulnerability?
  • Creative Commons Images and You: A quick guide for image users.
  • The New Yorker‘s Free App for Arts and Culture Event Listings. Download for Android and iOS.
  • Fox Plans To Bring Back ‘Cosmos’ Science Series. The host will be astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson.
  • The Worst Gig We Ever Played: Musicians on their on-stage lows.
  • The History of the Berlin Wall in 33 Photos: Der Spiegel’s photo essay marks the 50th anniversary of its building.
  • “Stuff about Kubrick:” A great set of random links that will satisfy any Stanley Kubrick fan.
  • The Strangest Dream: Documentary about the only man who left the Manhattan Project for moral reasons.
  • Foreign Language Lessons by the Peace Corps: Arabic in Jordan, Russian in Kazakhstan, Mandarin in China, etc. (Don’t miss our extensive collection, Learn Languages for Free: Spanish, English, Chinese & More.)
  • Who Are You Calling “Suckers”? Humanities grad students strike back!
  • Martha Nussbaum on Morality & Disgust: From the Open University’s Multiculturalism Bites podcast. Listen.
  • Escher Painting Refracted in a Drop of Falling WaterPhoto.
  • How Ancient Greek Statues Really Looked: Courtesy of ultraviolet light.
  • Movie Footage from Charlie Chaplin’s 77th birthday. Recorded in 1966.
  • Historical Photos of the Statue of Liberty: See it being built in 1886. It’s now closing for renovation.
  • Peter Bogdanovich on Why John Ford’s The Searchers may be the greatest western ever. Don’t miss 25 Free John Wayne films here, mostly all westerns.
  • At the Tomb of Tutankhamen: Photos were originally published in the May 1923 National Geographic magazine shortly after the tomb’s discovery.
  • William Faulkner Goes to First Hockey Game and Records His Impressions: Written in Sports Illustrated, 1955.
  • Big Interview with (and 2 Poems by) Philip Levine: Just named the 18th U.S. Poet Laureate.
  • It’s the Economy, Dummkopf! Michael Lewis looks at Germany’s role in the Eurozone crisis.
  • Sources: @matthiasrascher@webacion@WFMU,  @emediavitals,  @philosophybites@coudal, @eugenephoto, @brainpicker

    Open Culture Beat No. 7: The Best Culture Links of the Week

    What cultural goodies did we tweet (and re-tweet) on our Twitter stream during the past week? Here are some highlights. Follow us on Twitter at @openculture … or Like us on Facebook. We’ll keep you plugged in…

    Sources: @coudal,  @kottke,  @philosophybites,  @maudnewton,  @eugenephoto,  @courosa@matthiasrascher,  @BrainPicker.

    Open Culture Beat No. 6: The Best Culture Links of the Week

    What cultural goodies did we tweet (and re-tweet) on our Twitter stream during the past week? Here are some highlights. Follow us on Twitter at @openculture … or Like us on Facebook. We’ll keep you plugged in…

    Sources@opedr,  @kottke,  @PeterSinger,  @nprbooks,  @maudnewton,  @matthiasrascher,  @BrainPicker,  @BoingBoing,  @jessebdylan

    Open Culture No. 5: The Best Culture Links of the Week

    These cultural goodies (and others) flowed through our Twitter stream during the past week. Find us at @openculture … or Like us on Facebook get more intelligent media delivered daily.

    Sources: @eugenephoto,  @boingboing,  @pbkauf ,  @coudal,  @LAReviewofBooks,  @stevesilberman,  @kottke,  @brainpicker,  @webacion

    Open Culture Beat No. 4: The Best Culture Links of the Week

    These cultural goodies (and others) flowed through our Twitter stream during the past week. Find us at @openculture … or Like us on Facebook.

    Sources: @TheAtlanticWire,  @philosophybites,  @kottke,  @eugenephoto,  @thebookslut,  @hughmcguire,  @opedr, @brainpicker,  @webacion,   @kristinbutler,  @matthiasrascher.

    Open Culture Beat No. 3

    These cultural goodies (and others) flowed through our Twitter stream during the past week. Find us at @openculture … or Like us on Facebook.

    •Cult filmmaker John Waters talks about his transgressive humor, oddball lifestyle, and what inspires him.

    •Aussie student finds universe’s ‘missing mass,’ a problem that puzzled astrophysicists for decades.

    •Liking Is for Cowards. Go for What Hurts. Op-ed by Jonathan Franzen in The New York Times.

    Mladic the Monster by Christopher Hitchens.

    •Lost E.E. Cummings Poem Discovered. Story profiled in The Awl.

    •What If Walt Whitman Wrote For Groupon? Whitman’s birthday was yesterday. Read it here.

    •1964: Ken Kesey pens letter to The New York Times defending Broadway adaptation of One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest.

    •Lars von Trier interviewed shortly after getting booted from Cannes. 2 Parts.

    •Crosby, Nash & Young reunite on Late Night; Sing a Miley Cyrus song. Wink.

    •A.O. Scott reviews “The Tree of Life,” Palme d’Or winner at Cannes. See trailer here.

    •Pete Townshend profiled in longish Economist piece. New autobiography coming out this fall.

    •What is the IMF anyway? The always great Planet Money explains. Audio.

    •Yale gives honorary degrees to director Martin Scorsese and writer Joan Didion.

    •Egyptian pyramids found by infra-red satellite images.

    •Lady Gaga Takes Tea With Stephen Fry.

    •How Popular Science magazine has covered the Theory of Evolution since 1923.

    •Lindsay Lohan’s newest movie is an art project. Yes, her career has gotten that bad!

    •4th-Grade ‘Paleontologists’ Discover 11,500-Year-Old Mastodon Hair.

    •Fassbinder’s sci-fi masterpiece “World on a Wire” has been restored. See the trailer.

    •The most-rejected published novelist in history dies at 74.

    •Rousseau’s documents put on the UNESCO Memory of the World register.

    •Summer Reading List: 10 Essential Books for Cognitive Sunshine, courtesy of BrainPickings.

    •Want a college education? There’s an app for that.

    •The Most Well-Read Cities in America. A list published by Amazon.com.

    •Paul Theroux on the concept of being a stranger in different countries and languages.

    •Georgetown releases study showing how different college majors translate to earnings.

    These cultural goodies (and others) flowed through our Twitter stream during the past week. Find us at @openculture.

    Sources for this edition of Open Culture Beat include: @paulconley,  @opedr,  @webacion,  @ebertchicago,  @kristinbutler,  @sheerly,  @stevesilberman, @philosophybites, @matthiasrascher.

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    Open Culture was founded by Dan Colman.