2,000+ Cassettes from the Allen Ginsberg Audio Collection Now Streaming Online




Last month Colin Marshall gave you the scoop on Stanford University’s digitization of Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl,” a project that takes you inside the making of the iconic 1955 poem. As a quick follow up, it’s worth mentioning this: Stanford has also just put online over 2,000 Ginsberg audio cassette recordings, giving you access to “a staggering amount of primary source material associated with the Beat Generation” and its most acclaimed poet.

For a quick taste of what’s in the archive, Stanford Libraries points you to an afternoon breakfast table conversation between Ginsberg and another legendary Beat figure, William S. Burroughs. But you can rummage/search through the whole collection and find your own favorite recordings here.

via Stanford Libraries and Austin Kleon’s newsletter (which you should subscribe to here)

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Related Content:

Allen Ginsberg’s Howl Manuscripts Now Digitized & Put Online, Revealing the Beat Poet’s Creative Process

The First Recording of Allen Ginsberg Reading “Howl” (1956)

Allen Ginsberg Reads His Famously Censored Beat Poem, “Howl” (1959)

James Franco Reads a Dreamily Animated Version of Allen Ginsberg’s Epic Poem ‘Howl’

Allen Ginsberg’s “Celestial Homework”: A Reading List for His Class “Literary History of the Beats

Allen Ginsberg Recordings Brought to the Digital Age. Listen to Eight Full Tracks for Free

Allen Ginsberg’s Handwritten Poem For Bernie Sanders, “Burlington Snow” (1986)


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