How to Live to Be 100 and Beyond: 9 Diet & Lifestyle Tips

A little public service announcement... Dan Buettner, a writer for National Geographic, has studied the world's longest-lived peoples. Most of his findings are summed up in his book, The Blue Zones: Lessons for Living Longer From the People Who've Lived the Longest. And here, in this Ted Talk, he boils things down even further, giving you 9 common diet and lifestyle habits found among the world's oldest populations. They've been usefully summarized by PresentationZen as follows:

Move Naturally
(1) You don't need a formal, rigorous exercise plan. We're talking here a change in lifestyle that is fundamentally active. We're designed to move. We've not meant to drive 100 meters in a car to pick up chips at the local store. Walk, do yard work, whatever. Do exercises/activities that you enjoy.

Have Right Outlook
(2) Slow down. When you're constantly in a hurry and stressed out, this has a negative impact on your health. Limiting negative stress is one of the healthiest things you can do for yourself.
(3) Have a clear purpose. The Japanese call it "ikigai" 生き甲斐 (lit: life + value, be worth while). You must have a passion, a calling, a purpose. There's got to be a reason to get out of bed every day.

Eat Wisely
(4) Drink a little (wine) everyday.
(5) Eat mainly plant-based foods. Small amounts of meat and fish are OK.
(6) Hara Hachi Bu: Eat until 80% full. Do not eat eat until you're stuffed. (I've talked about this many time before in the context of presentation.)

Be Connected with others
(7) Put family, loved ones first.
(8) Belong to a community. Many in his study belonged to faith-based communities.
(9) Belong to the right tribe. That is, hang out with people with healthy habits, physical and emotional ones.

Takes these tips to heart, and please share them with friends...

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