The Periodic Table of Elements Scaled to Show The Elements’ Actual Abundance on Earth

in Science | October 8th, 2015

elements_relative_abundance

When you learned about The Periodic Table of Elements in high school, it probably didn’t look like this. Above, we have a different way of visualizing the elements. Created by Professor William F. Sheehan at Santa Clara University in 1970, this chart takes the elements (usually shown like this) and scales them relative to their abundance on the Earth’s surface. In the small print beneath the chart, Sheehan notes “The chart emphasizes that in real life a chemist will probably meet O, Si, Al [Oxygen, Silicon and Aluminum] and that he better do something about it.” Click here to see the chart — and the less abundant elements — in a larger format. Below we have a few more creative takes on the Periodic Table.

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by | Make a Comment (15)




Comments (15)

  1. Melissa says . . .
    October 9, 2015 / 2:57 pm

    Open Culture. great site.

  2. Porfirio Zandi says . . .
    October 10, 2015 / 2:03 am

    The link Click here to see the chart shows no service available

  3. Svein Olav Nyberg says . . .
    October 10, 2015 / 6:38 am

    Are the sizes proportional to abundance directly, or the logarithms of the abundances?

  4. N ESpinoza says . . .
    October 10, 2015 / 1:10 pm

    Periodic Table with {wildly inaccurate} EMPHASIS

  5. Claudi Mans says . . .
    October 11, 2015 / 9:02 am

    Totally wrong…

  6. Lauren says . . .
    October 12, 2015 / 1:29 pm

    Cool, but not correct. Still continues to float around the internet…

    http://chemreflux.blogspot.com/2014/12/periodic-table-with-wildly-inaccurate.html

  7. Darwin says . . .
    October 17, 2015 / 2:04 am

    Yeah. I’d think there should be more hydrogen and iron. Hydrogen is the most plentiful substance in the universe, and the earth is a whole lotta iron with some other stuff.

  8. Me says . . .
    October 28, 2015 / 6:02 am

    haha Si is silicium, not silicon !

  9. Dan Colman says . . .
    October 28, 2015 / 9:38 am

    Google “si periodic table” and see what you get.

    Dan

  10. Raegan says . . .
    November 2, 2015 / 6:33 pm

    I thinks this is incorrect because it does not have the atomic mass nor number.

  11. henadzi filipenka says . . .
    January 1, 2016 / 10:56 am

    About the table of elements.
    http://hfilipen-talentedchildren.blogspot.com

  12. Danny says . . .
    January 2, 2016 / 9:35 am

    This isn’t very accurate, as the least abundant element is Astatine at the bottom of group 17 and it doesn’t have even close to the smallest box.

  13. nick says . . .
    January 3, 2016 / 8:17 am

    There is not more Platinum (Pt) and Palladium (Pd) than Nickel and there isn’t more Gold (Au) and Silver (Ag) than copper.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abundance_of_elements_in_Earth%27s_crust

    cool concept but plain wrong.

  14. Dan Colman says . . .
    January 4, 2016 / 9:22 am

    Hi there,

    Does anyone know who gave our post a mention on Facebook today?

    Thanks in advance,
    Dan (editor)

  15. Denis says . . .
    January 5, 2016 / 11:39 am

    This is nice but this is obviously wrong ! Unless there is almost the same amount of californium, neptunium, etc and of cobalt… there is not as much minor actinide as vanadium for exemple…

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