Einstein for the Masses: Yale Presents a Primer on the Great Physicist’s Thinking

Who could­n’t use this? A basic intro­duc­tion to Ein­stein’s think­ing – one that assumes no pri­or knowl­edge, just an open mind. In one short hour, Rama­mur­ti Shankar (Pro­fes­sor of Physics & Applied Physics at Yale) breaks down Ein­stein’s the­o­ries and for­mu­las for a lay audi­ence. If this whets your appetite, then you’ll want to down­load Shankar’s free course called The Fun­da­men­tals of Physics. You can down­load it here (iTunes — YouTubeWeb Site), or find it in the Physics sec­tion of our big col­lec­tion of Free Online Cours­es.

Relat­ed Con­tent:

Mod­ern Physics: A Com­plete Intro­duc­tion

Bill Gates Puts Richard Feyn­man Lec­tures Online

Learn­ing Physics Through Free Cours­es

Daniel Pink: The Surprising Truth about What Motivates Us

RSA offers up anoth­er ani­mat­ed video explain­ing what makes us tick. This time, they’re fea­tur­ing a lec­ture by Daniel Pink, the best­selling author of Dri­ve: The Sur­pris­ing Truth About What Moti­vates Us. Revis­it­ing research also found in Dan Ariely’s new book, The Upside of Irra­tional­i­ty, Pink dri­ves home the point that tra­di­tion­al moti­va­tion schemes – name­ly, bonus­es – rarely achieve their intend­ed results. In fact, the big­ger the bonus, the big­ger the decline in per­for­mance. Or so stud­ies show again and again. So what does moti­vate us? The desire to be self-direct­ed. The will to mas­ter some­thing. The hope to make a con­tri­bu­tion. It’s all what Pink calls “the pur­pose motive,” and it’s the stuff that keeps this site mov­ing along.

Relat­ed Con­tent:

Dan Ariely on the Irra­tional­i­ty of Bonus­es

Bar­bara Ehren­re­ich on The Per­ils of Pos­i­tive Psy­chol­o­gy

Philip Zim­bar­do on The Secret Pow­ers of Time

via Fora.TV

We Are Here: The Pale Blue Dot


Let Carl Sagan put every­thing – and I mean every­thing – in per­spec­tive for you …

(And see his relat­ed book, The Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space)

Thanks Zoran for send­ing!!

Bruce Lee Auditions for The Green Hornet (1964)

Here’s where the leg­end of Bruce Lee all began (at least for Amer­i­can audi­ences). Back in 1964, Lee, only 24 years old, was invit­ed to audi­tion for The Green Hor­net. And he nailed it, land­ing a star­ring role on the short-lived ABC tele­vi­sion series. Dur­ing these eight vin­tage min­utes, Lee gives you, the view­er, the the­o­ry and prac­tice of kung fu. It’s all rather enjoy­able to watch, unless you’re the slow-reflexed man shar­ing the stage with him. The real action begins at the 4:05 minute mark.

Thanks to Maria Popo­va, aka @BrainPicker, for giv­ing us a heads up on this…

If you would like to sign up for Open Culture’s free email newslet­ter, please find it here.

If you would like to sup­port the mis­sion of Open Cul­ture, con­sid­er mak­ing a dona­tion to our site. It’s hard to rely 100% on ads, and your con­tri­bu­tions will help us con­tin­ue pro­vid­ing the best free cul­tur­al and edu­ca­tion­al mate­ri­als to learn­ers every­where. You can con­tribute through Pay­Pal, Patre­on, and Ven­mo (@openculture). Thanks!

The Meta Summer Reading List

Now time for some beach wor­thy books… Fla­vor­wire has pulled togeth­er a meta col­lec­tion of sum­mer read­ing lists, aggre­gat­ing books rec­om­mend­ed by The New York Times, NPR, UC Berke­ley, Details, Brook­lyn Pub­lic Library and sev­en oth­er sources. Some­where in this mix you’ll find that per­fect read.

Try Audi­ble Now and Get A FREE Audio­book! Details here.

Kubrick vs. Scorsese Montage

Ear­li­er this year, Lean­dro Cop­per­field spent days re-watch­ing the films of Quentin Taran­ti­no and the Coen broth­ers. Then, using 500+ scenes from 17 movies, he devel­oped a mon­tage trib­ute sim­ply called Taran­ti­no vs Coen Broth­ers. This pair­ing makes a cer­tain amount of sense. Both have a won­der­ful knack for aes­theti­ciz­ing vio­lence. But what’s the thread that runs through Cop­per­field­’s lat­est short trib­ute, Kubrick vs Scors­ese? Per­haps it’s quite sim­ply the grandeur of their film­mak­ing. About Kubrick­’s artistry Scors­ese said, “Watch­ing a Kubrick film is like gaz­ing up at a moun­tain­top. You look up and won­der, how could any­one have climbed that high? There are emo­tion­al pas­sages and images and spaces in his films that have an inex­plic­a­ble pow­er…” And, you can’t help but think that Kubrick looked at Scors­ese’s work with a sim­i­lar sense of awe.

Scors­ese offers more thoughts on Kubrick in this 2001 episode of Char­lie Rose. It’s worth a watch. For more great films, please see our col­lec­tion of Free Movies Online.

via @BrainPicker and Kot­tke

If you would like to sign up for Open Culture’s free email newslet­ter, please find it here.

If you would like to sup­port the mis­sion of Open Cul­ture, con­sid­er mak­ing a dona­tion to our site. It’s hard to rely 100% on ads, and your con­tri­bu­tions will help us con­tin­ue pro­vid­ing the best free cul­tur­al and edu­ca­tion­al mate­ri­als to learn­ers every­where. You can con­tribute through Pay­Pal, Patre­on, and Ven­mo (@openculture). Thanks!

Meryl Streep Gives Graduation Speech at Barnard

Meryl Streep has been nom­i­nat­ed for 16 Acad­e­my Awards, and won two, over her bril­liant act­ing career. She’s one of Amer­i­ca’s greats. But it has­n’t gone to her head. Above, we have Streep giv­ing the grad­u­a­tion speech last month at Barnard (the wom­en’s lib­er­al arts col­lege affil­i­at­ed with Colum­bia Uni­ver­si­ty). And what comes across is some­one who does­n’t take her­self or act­ing too seri­ous­ly. Some­one who still gets a lit­tle charm­ing­ly ner­vous speak­ing in front of crowds. And some­one who rec­og­nizes that we glob­al­ly – and women par­tic­u­lar­ly – have major chal­lenges to con­tend with. It’s worth a watch, along with one of my favorite com­mence­ment speech­es: Steve Jobs at Stan­ford, 2005.

If you would like to sign up for Open Culture’s free email newslet­ter, please find it here.

If you would like to sup­port the mis­sion of Open Cul­ture, con­sid­er mak­ing a dona­tion to our site. It’s hard to rely 100% on ads, and your con­tri­bu­tions will help us con­tin­ue pro­vid­ing the best free cul­tur­al and edu­ca­tion­al mate­ri­als to learn­ers every­where. You can con­tribute through Pay­Pal, Patre­on, and Ven­mo (@openculture). Thanks!

Chaos & Creation at Abbey Road: Paul McCartney Revisits The Beatles’ Fabled Recording Studio

In 2005, Paul McCart­ney returned to Stu­dio 2 at Abbey Road, the famous (and recent­ly endan­gered) site where the The Bea­t­les record­ed their won­drous albums. (Watch some orig­i­nal footage here.) As part of the BBC pro­duc­tion, Chaos & Cre­ation at Abbey Road, McCart­ney intro­duces view­ers to vin­tage instru­ments used by the band and an assort­ment of record­ing tech­niques. And, above, we have Sir Paul recount­ing the very first moments when he and John Lennon met, then break­ing into a ver­sion of “Twen­ty Flight Rock,” the Eddie Cochran song he played to audi­tion for The Quar­ry Men (lat­er to become The Bea­t­les). You can watch the full pro­gram above.

« Go BackMore in this category... »
Quantcast
Open Culture was founded by Dan Colman.