New Iranian Video Game, Engare, Explores the Elegant Geometry of Islamic Art

The intersection of mathematics and art holds out great potential for not just endless discoveries but deeply memorable creations. The 20th-century visionary M.C. Escher understood that, but so did the Islamic artists of centuries before that inspired him. They've also inspired the Iranian game developer Mahdi Bahrami, whose newest effort Engare stands at the cross of mathematics, art, and technology, a puzzle video game that challenges its players to complete the kind of brilliantly colorful, mathematically rigorous, and at once both strikingly simple and strikingly complex patterns seen in traditional Islamic art and design.

"The leap from the bare bones prototype to it becoming a game about creating art was a small one, given that Islamic art is steeped in mathematical knowledge," writes Kill Screen's Chris Priestman.




"The visual flair of Islamic art also helps to further ensure that Engare doesn’t ever feel 'dry.' Yes, it’s a game about math, but there are no dull equations to solve. Yet, the same ideas that those equations belong to are approached in Engare, just from a different angle and one that Bahrami reckons can also evoke emotions. You can see this in mesmerizing action in the gameplay trailer just above.

“There are geometrical shapes that make us feel happy, patterns that make someone nervous/hypnotized, the tiling of a ceiling can make someone feel lonely," Priestman quotes Bahrami as writing. He's done this sort of emotional thinking about visual mathematics before: his previous game Farsh "had you rolling out Persian carpets in such a way as to create paths across the levels," and his next one Tandis is "inspired by Celtic shapes, and is a wild and unpredictable experiment in topographical transformation." If you'd like to give Engare a try, you can get it from its website or on Steam. When the 21st century's M.C. Escher discovers Islamic art, will he do it through the medium of video games?

via Kill Screen

Related Content:

The Complex Geometry of Islamic Art & Design: A Short Introduction

Back to Bed: A New Video Game Inspired by the Surreal Artwork of Escher, Dali & Magritte

Californium: New Video Game Lets You Experience the Surreal World of Philip K. Dick

Ancient Greek Punishments: The Retro Video Game

Mathematics Made Visible: The Extraordinary Mathematical Art of M.C. Escher

Based in Seoul, Colin Marshall writes and broadcasts on cities and culture. His projects include the book The Stateless City: a Walk through 21st-Century Los Angeles and the video series The City in Cinema. Follow him on Twitter at @colinmarshall or on Facebook.


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