Filmmaker Creates a Luxury-Style Car Commercial to Sell a 21-Year-Old Used Honda Accord

This is not your average car commercial. It has the look and feel of the luxury car commercials you've seen so many times. And yet it features a car with 141,095 miles on it. Filmmaker Max Lanman created the ad to help his girlfriend sell her used 1996 Honda Accord. For reasons you'll quickly understand, the video went viral, clocked more than 5 million views this past week, and when the car was listed on eBay, bids soared to $150,000--before eBay apparently pulled the plug “due to concerns around illegitimate bidding.” Enjoy the ad. And remember, “Luxury is a state of mind.”

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An Online Trove of Historic Sewing Patterns & Costumes

As Halloween draws nigh, our thoughts turn to costumes.

Not those rubbery, poorly constructed, sexy and/or gory off-the-rack readymades, but the sort of lavish, historically accurate, home-sewn affairs that would have earned praise and extra candy, if only our mother had been inclined to spend the bulk of October chained to a sewing machine.

Not that one needs the excuse of a holiday to suit up in a fluffy 50’s crinoline, a Tudor-style kirtle gown, or a 16th-century Flemish outfit with all the trimmings....

Accountant Artemisia Moltabocca, creator of the historical and cosplay costuming blog Costuming Diary, has primed our pump with a list of free historical medieval, Elizabethan and Victorian patterns, including ones for the garments mentioned above.




Click through the many links on her site and you may find yourself tumbling down a rabbit hole of some other cos-player's generosity.

That link to the custom corset pattern generator may set you on the road to creating a perfectly fitted Viking apron or a good-for-beginners tunic. (Bring out yer dead!)

Fancy even more choices? Moltabocca’s Free Historical Costume Patterns Pinterest board is a veritable trove of dress-up fun.

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s Costume and Textiles Project has detailed downloadable PDFs to walk you through construction of such anachronistic finery as a 1940’s Zoot Suit, a 19th-century boy’s frock (above), and a man’s vest with removable chest pads (hubba hubba).

An 1812 Ohio Militia Officer’s Coat from the Ohio Historical Society.

A pair of Nankeen Trousers courtesy of the Royal Ontario Museum.

A bullet bra (hubba bubba redux!)—pair it with a 1940s Vogue hat and handbag and you’re ready to go!

A Regency Drawn Bonnet and an Improved Seamless Whalebone Underskirt from E. & J. Holmes & Co, Boston, 1857.

If you’re feeling less than confident about your sewing abilities, you might make like an upper-class Roman in an Ionian chiton.

Or just curl a synthetic wig!

Press someone else’s seams with a straightening iron (above), then kick back and enjoy the vintage ads, photos of antique garments, and the period information that often accompanies these how-tos. And check out the 1913 patent application for Marie Perillat’s Bust Reducer, a miracle invention designed to “prevent flesh bulging while providing self adjustable, comfortable, hygienic support.”

Begin with some of Costuming Diary’s historical sewing patterns before delving into its massive pattern collection board on Pinterest.

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Ayun Halliday is an author, illustrator, theater maker and Chief Primatologist of the East Village Inky zine. Her current sewing project is 19 headpieces for Theater of the Apes Sub-Adult Division’s upcoming production of Animal Farm at the Tank in New York City. Follow her @AyunHalliday.

If You Drive Down a Stretch of Route 66, the Road Will Play “America the Beautiful”

If you find yourself in New Mexico, traveling down a stretch of Route 66, you can drive over a quarter mile-long rumble strip and your car's tires will play "America the Beautiful."  That's assuming you're driving at the speed limit, 45 miles per hour. Don't believe me? Watch the clip above.

As Atlas Obscura explains, the "Musical Highway" or "Singing Highway" was "installed in 2014 as part of a partnership between the New Mexico Department of Transportation and the National Geographic Channel." It's all part of an elaborate attempt to get drivers to slow down and obey the speed limit. "Getting the rumble strips to serenade travelers required a fair bit of engineering. The individual strips had to be placed at the precise distance from one another to produce the notes they needed to sing their now-signature song."

You'll find this particular stretch of road between Albuquerque and Tijeras. Here's the location on Google Maps. Other musical rumble strips have popped up in Denmark, Japan and South Korea.

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The Velvet Underground Meets Lawrence Welk

The worlds of the Velvet Underground and Lawrence Welk are pretty far apart. On the one side, you have a gritty New York band city writing lyrics about shooting up heroin. On the other, a bandleader whose "champagne music" charmed TV viewers across Middle America for 27 straight years. And yet. And yet.

In this 2007 YouTube classic, director/producer Darren Hacker found a way to cross the chasm, mashing up VU's 1968 song "Sister Ray" with footage from the Lawrence Welk Show. As he explained to Dangerous Minds, “I rigged up 2 ancient VCRs and a CD player across my living room floor, layed down on my stomach, cued everything up and then manually activated all 3 devices at precise intervals, live…in real time. One take, no edits…” Everything lined up, just like that.

Enjoy "Lawrence Welk Meets Velvet Underground" and imagine a moment when, circa 1968, VU went mainstream on the milquetoast Lawrence Welk Show.

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54 Cats Riding Out Hurricane Irma in Ernest Hemingway’s Key West Home

The Ernest Hemingway Home and Museum provides a sanctuary to 54 polydactyl (six-toed) cats.  According to the museum, a ship captain once gave Ernest a white six-toed cat, and now some of its descendents live in the Hemingway Home and Museum located in Key West--precisely where Hurricane Irma is now making landfall.

As curator David Gonzales explains above, he and the 54 Hemingway cats have no plans to evacuate. They're going to ride out the storm and protect the novelist's historic home. We wish them all the best. The same goes to all of our friends in Florida. We'll see you when the storm passes.

You can see some of the Hemingway polydactyl cats here.

via Metafilter

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The Addams Family Dance to The Ramones’ “Blitzkrieg Bop”

In the spirit of Andrew Sullivan's Mental Health Break, we give you this: The Addams Family Dancing to The Ramones' 1976 track, "Blitzkrieg Bop." For a brief moment, forget the hurricanes, the threat of nuclear war, the fires burning in LA, Montana, Washington, DC and the hearts of white supremacists. Breathe in. Breathe out. And repeat after me. "Hey Ho......Let's go!"

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Watch “The Woodswimmer,” a Stop Motion Film Made Entirely with Wood, and “Brutally Tedious” Techniques

Above you can watch "The Woodswimmer," a new stop-motion music video shot by Brett Foxwell. As Foxwell describes it, the film was shot with "a straightforward technique but one which is brutally tedious to complete."  Elaborating, he told the website This is Colossal, "Fascinated with the shapes and textures found in both newly-cut and long-dead pieces of wood, I envisioned a world composed entirely of these forms.”  “As I began to engage with the material, I conceived a method using a milling machine and an animation camera setup to scan through a wood sample photographically and capture its entire structure. Although a difficult and tedious technique to refine, it yielded gorgeous imagery at once abstract and very real. Between the twisting growth rings, swirling rays, knot holes, termites and rot, I found there is a lot going on inside of wood."

Finally, Foxwell notes on his personal website: "As a short film began to build from [the filmed sequences], I collaborated with bedtimes, an animator and musician of special talents to write a song and help edit a tight visual and sonic journey through this wondrous and fascinating material. WoodSwimmer is the result."

Watch it, in all of its glory, above.

via This is Colossal

Follow Open Culture on Facebook and Twitter and share intelligent media with your friends. Or better yet, sign up for our daily email and get a daily dose of Open Culture in your inbox. 

If you'd like to support Open Culture and our mission, please consider making a donation to our site. It's hard to rely 100% on ads, and your contributions will help us provide the best free cultural and educational materials.

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