Summertime: Willie Nelson Sings Gershwin Is Now Streaming Free for a Limited Time




willie_gershwin

A quick fyi: You now stream for a limited time Summertime: Willie Nelson Sings Gershwin. The new album features Nelson covering 11 classic songs written by George and Ira Gershwin. And it includes duets with Cyndi Lauper and Sheryl Crow. You can stream the album (due to be officially released on February 26th) right below, or hear it over on NPR’s First Listen site. Enjoy.

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Comments (2)
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  • Martin Cohen says:

    This is so nice. I love the Gershwins, and I am now just sinking into Willie’s captivating voice.

    Amazon led me to some other albums of his, which looks like money well spent.

    Thank you.

  • Benno Rosenthal says:

    The ultimate Gershwin interpretation is Ella Fitzgerald’s Gershwin Songbook CD’s. Willie Nelson’s Gershwin’s interpretation is good but does measure up to Ella Fitzgerald’s.

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