Watch the Titanic Sink in Real Time in a New 2‑Hour, 40 Minute Animation

From the mak­ers of Titan­ic: Hon­or and Glo­rya PC video game that lets you sail aboard a ful­ly detailed re-cre­ation of the RMS Titan­ic–comes an ani­ma­tion that lets you watch the sink­ing of the Titan­ic in real time. Accord­ing to the web site Titan­ic Facts, the ship sank in two hours and 40 min­utes in 1912. And that’s pre­cise­ly how long things take to unfold in the video above. The ani­ma­tion nar­rates the events in a fair­ly straight­for­ward way–nothing like the dra­mat­ic scenes paint­ed in James Cameron’s 1997 fic­tion­al­ized film. But it’s still worth the watch. 

In the Relat­eds below, you can check out two relat­ed clips — a vin­tage clip show­ing footage of the actu­al Titan­ic in 1911, and anoth­er ani­mat­ed reen­act­ment of the Titan­ic sink­ing, this one cre­at­ed by Cameron him­self.

via coudal.com

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Relat­ed Con­tent:

The Titan­ic: Rare Footage of the Ship Before Dis­as­ter Strikes

How the Titan­ic Sank: James Cameron’s New CGI Ani­ma­tion

Titan­ic: The Nazis Cre­ate a Mega-Bud­get Pro­pa­gan­da Film About the Ill-Fat­ed Ship … and Then Banned It (1943)


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