The Famous Stanford Prison Experiment on YouTube

Back in 1971, Philip Zimbardo, a Stanford psychology professor, set up an experiment that quickly and now famously went awry. Here, Zimbardo had undergraduates play the role of prisoners and prison guards in a mock prison environment. Meant to last two weeks, the experiment was cut short after only six days when the guards, as The Stanford Prison Experiment web site puts it, “became sadistic and [the] prisoners became depressed and showed signs of extreme stress.” For Zimbardo, the way things played out says a lot about what happens when good people are put in bad situations. And it speaks to how torture scenarios, like those at Abu Ghraib, become possible. (For more on the parallels between the prison experiment and the torture in Iraq, you may want to check out Zimbardo’s talk at a recent conference called “Thinking Humanity After Abu Ghraib.” (Get the podcast here.)


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  1. elearnspace says . . . | December 10, 2007 / 5:28 pm

    Making science accessible…

    Five plus years ago, as blogs and wikis were beginning their emergence from the technology field to wider use, I frequently encountered comments acknowledging their value for communication, but with a tone that questioned their practical application in…

  2. stanford prison experiment says . . . | February 6, 2008 / 6:15 am

    […] http://www.oculture.com/2007/03/the_famous_stan.html The Famous Stanford Prison Experiment on YouTube | Open Culture Meant to last two weeks, the experiment was cut short after only six days when the guards, as The Stanford Prison Experiment web site puts it, … […]

  3. 125 εξαιρετικά video σχετικά με τις επιστήμες | φυσικές επιστήμες κ.α. says . . . | July 14, 2011 / 2:46 am

    […] Famous Stanford Prison Experiment on YouTube – Video- Conducted by Philip Zimbardo, a Stanford psychology professor, in 1971, the experiment shows how […]

  4. k smith says . . . | July 14, 2011 / 11:17 am

    what psychological monitoring of all staff within the prison system, as well as the prisoners is occurring….especially now more than 30 years later? Does any of what occurred in this experiment change the way they run the prison system? Did any of what was learned used in torture techniques or referred to when trying to gain leverage on captive persons in war situations. I guess what I wonder, is whether the experiment was in itself an exponential experiment for a greater project or desire for information from persons that could use it for military, government, private gain.

  5. Website says . . . | August 3, 2011 / 3:22 am

    Website…

    The Famous Stanford Prison Experiment on YouTube | Open Culture…

  6. The Great Dr. Fox Lecture: A Vintage Academic Hoax (1970) | Open Culture says . . . | September 26, 2011 / 11:04 am

    […] The Stanford Prison Experiment on YouTube […]

  7. The Power of Conformity | Open Culture says . . . | October 12, 2011 / 5:11 am

    […] about human psychology — something that social psychologist Philip Zimbardo, famous for his Stanford Prison Experiment, describes on a website related to his 2007 book The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People […]

  8. The Paradox of Conformism and Individualism — C L O S E R says . . . | December 28, 2011 / 5:02 am

    […] psychologist Philip Zimbardo writes about in the Lucifer Effect. Zimbardo is mostly known from his Stanford Prison Experiment. In the website dedicated to his book The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil, […]

  9. bob says . . . | October 31, 2012 / 4:32 pm

    hang them all

  10. bob says . . . | October 31, 2012 / 4:35 pm

    do not drop the soap hahaha

  11. bill says . . . | October 31, 2012 / 4:43 pm

    do not be so meen just shoot them and do the tests then

  12. bill says . . . | October 31, 2012 / 4:44 pm

    come on 3 2 1 open the trap door
    back to the good old days

  13. matt says . . . | November 1, 2012 / 3:40 pm

    lets try some new torcher tequnecs at the same time now

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