The Tiny Transforming Apartment: 8 Rooms in 420 Square Feet

Welcome to the New York city apartment of Graham Hill, a Canadian-born architect committed to bringing sustainability into the mainstream. His apartment does more with less. It has a footprint of only 420 square feet. Yet it’s elegantly-designed and completely functional. What initially looks like a simple studio unfolds into much more, a Soho apartment that features no less than eight rooms — a bedroom, guest room, kitchen, office and the rest. We’ll let Graham, the founder of treehugger.com, take you on the grand tour, and we’ll leave you to wonder what a designer could do with this Parisian apartment measuring only 17 square feet….

H/T Jason G. via Gizmodo

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by | Permalink | Comments (7) |

  • Ruud Klerks

    Hi, I really would like to suggest to add a foldable table in the toilet for a laptop or to do some writing when you have a private phonecall.
    Well done!

  • http://kronosphere.com Nicholas Kronos

    The text on the video says 350 square feet, whereas the story says 420 square feet.

  • Cathleen Palmer

    Well done, indeed! I also wonder about a change in “feel” by going from ultra modern to a bit more traditional using a different medium for walls and floors throughout such as a hard wood – a light burnished elm for instance (supposing feng shui was a bigger object than $$). Can you see any reasons why that wouldn’t work? Looking at retirement in the face, we’ll be downsizing in a big way soon. Wonderful to see what’s possible. Thanks!

  • http://www.davensjournal.com Mari

    The Goliath table was amazing.

  • Dan Colman

    Yup, he also mentions in the video that it was 420 square feet. So we went with that. Whoever gave the video a title seems to have made an error.

    Cheers,
    Dan

  • jack

    regarding retirement and downsizing — many
    art objects, wall-art, and personality related ‘things’ will necessarily need to be eliminated. Also, for an older person, good knees, good back, and flexibility would be required. Think of the comfort-zone of an airplane bathroom. I am a hedonist. For an even loving couple, this arrangement is perhaps too much togetherness — one must consider. Utility, space, and creativity are all spectacular! For a young, affluent individual — what a beauty — in the long term, one would be looking for other solutions.

  • http://docprof.blogspot.com/ Dr.Prof.

    Wonderful! Reminds me of a renovated walk-up I lived in on the Upper East Side of NYC in the late 1990’s. I think I measured the living space as 10×12′ excluding kitchenette and bathroom. This space has volume (which my studio was lacking) and of course the sliding unit which makes the space look downright huge. Well done.

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