From filmmaker Steve Olpin comes a short documentary (a “documentary poem”) called Earth and Fire, about artist and primitive potter Kelly Magleby. The film follows Kelly as she travels into “the backcountry of Southern Utah with a knife and a buckskin for 10 days to try to learn about Anasazi pottery by doing it the way the Anasazi did it.” On her website, Kelly writes “My desire to make Anasazi pottery started with my interest in primitive and survival skills. I love the fact that you can go into the wild with nothing and get all you need to survive and even flourish from the earth. The idea that you can go out and dig up some ‘dirt’, shape it, paint it and fire it all using only materials found in nature is amazing to me.” On her site, she details her method for making the pottery. Find more info about the Anasazi and their pottery here and here.

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  • Beverly Fry says:

    As far as I am concerned the only mistake this lady made was in labeling her work as Anasazi. Knowing the probable method and purpose of making pottery “from scratch”is not a sin. It is illegal and a defamation to a culture to claim that her pottery is Anasazi or Acoma or Mound Builder. It is Olga Alexander pottery and shares method to a degree with all other pottery.

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