How Schools Can Start Teaching Online in a Short Period of Time: Free Tutorials from the Stanford Online High School

Image by King of Hearts, via Wikimedia Commons

A quick note: The Stanford Online High School--an independent high school that operates fully online--has created video tutorials designed for schools that may need to close classrooms and pivot online. "All guidance is platform-agnostic, focusing on the essential steps for preparing to teach online in a short period of time."

In addition to this videos, the Online High School will host a free webinar today at 2pm California time. You can register here and learn more about the transition to online teaching.

Note: Zoom--which provides a turnkey video conferencing solution--has made its product free for K-12 institutions during the COVID-19 crisis. This can help schools spin up online courses quickly. More on that here.

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  • some lurker says:

    The missing ingredient, of course, is some way to receive all this information/instruction. How useful is one telephone? Not very. You need *two.* Preferably more but at least two.

    The students/families who need this the most, those who can least afford to miss instruction, are the least likely to have a way to access online education. Districts/school systems that offer it are likely based in areas without that pronounced a degree of inequality. But that’s not universal.

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