The 10 Greatest Films of All Time According to 846 Film Critics

We’ve recently featured the all-time-greatest-film-selections from such celebrated directors as Stanley Kubrick, Martin Scorsese, Woody Allen, and Quentin Tarantino. Some of these lists came from the grand poll put on last year by Sight & Sound, the British Film Institute’s well-respected cinema journal. While scrutinizing the voting records in the directors’ division yields no small pleasure for the cinephile, to focus too closely on that would ignore the big picture. By that, I mean the overall standings in this most painstaking critical effort to determine “the Greatest Films of All Time”:Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)

  1. Citizen Kane (Orson Welles, 1941)
  2. Tokyo Story (Yasujirô Ozu, 1953)
  3. La Règle du jeu (Jean Renoir, 1939)
  4. Sunrise (F.W. Murnau, 1927)
  5. 2001: A Space Odyssey (Stanley Kubrick, 1968)
  6. The Searchers (John Ford, 1956)
  7. Man with a Movie Camera (Dziga Vertov, 1929)
  8. The Passion of Joan of Arc (Carl Theodor Dreyer, 1928)
  9. (Federico Fellini, 1963)

These results came out with a bang — the sound, of course, of Vertigo displacing Citizen Kane. How many who watched the young Orson Welles’ debut during its financially inauspicious original run could have guessed it would one day stand as a byword for the height of cinematic craftsmanship? But Citizen Kane just flopped, drawing a good deal of critical acclaim even as it did so, whereas, seventeen years later, Hitchcock’s Vertigo not only flopped, but did so into a fog of mixed reviews, tumbling unceremoniously from there into obscurity. Prints became scarce, and the ones Hitchcock aficionados could later track down had seen better days. It would take a kind of obsession — not to mention a thorough restoration — to return Vertigo to the zeitgeist.

We ignored Vertigo at our peril, and if we now ignore Citizen Kane because of its new second-chair status, we do that at our peril as well. The 90-minute documentary aired, The Complete Citizen Kane, originally aired in 1991 as an episode of the BBC’s Arena. It looks at Welles’ masterpiece from every possible angle, even bringing in New Yorker critic Pauline Kael, whose essay “Raising Kane” took a controversial anti-auteurist position about this most seemingly auteur-driven of all American films.

Related Content:

Quentin Tarantino Lists the 12 Greatest Films of All Time: From Taxi Driver to The Bad News Bears

Woody Allen Lists the Greatest Films of All Time: Includes Classics by Bergman, Truffaut & Fellini

Martin Scorsese Reveals His 12 Favorite Movies (and Writes a New Essay on Film Preservation)

Stanley Kubrick’s List of Top 10 Films (The First and Only List He Ever Created)

Philosopher Slavoj Zizek Interprets Hitchcock’s Vertigo in The Pervert’s Guide to Cinema (2006)

Orson Welles Explains Why Ignorance Was the Genius Behind Citizen Kane

Colin Marshall hosts and produces Notebook on Cities and Culture and writes essays on literature, film, cities, Asia, and aesthetics. He’s at work on a book about Los AngelesA Los Angeles Primer. Follow him on Twitter at @colinmarshall.

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by | Permalink | Comments (103) |

  • BaztheSpaz

    No credible list of greatest films can ignore “Casablanca” and be taken seriously.

  • fireball

    Old people actually believe this.

  • Sputters

    Yes, and as we all know in our hearts… film critics know next to nothing about good movies.

  • JimFranco

    A critic isn’t an atypical movie fan. So tired of being told what I should or shouldn’t like. Why can’t I enjoy Carwash and American Pie better than movies from the 20′s without feeling like I have no film taste? Being a critic is as over-rated as it comes, it’s like working as a social media consultant. Zzzzzzzzzzz

  • TruthHurts

    What about Shawshank Redemption, The Godfather, Goodfellas, Pulp Fiction, and many many others? Are we currently living in the 20th century or what?

  • Ozymonkeybutt

    Bah. “City Lights”. Just because it’s silent doesn’t mean it’s not Great.

  • Seth Derrick

    You’re not being told what to like. You’re being told what people who (supposedly) have dedicated a huge portion of their lives to studying the craft and history of film like. Like whatever you like. Everyone is entitled to their opinion but not all opinions carry the same gravitas. Jenny McCarthy is entitled to her opinion on vaccines but her opinion carries a bit less weight on the matter than, say, an immunologist. Why don’t people get this?

  • rejane florinda

    Oh, people. Relax. If you don’t agree with the list just do your own list. I am apalled they did not include the The Seventh Seal, or any of Akira Kurosawa movies. You see, lists are only created to be discredited

  • rejane florinda

    hey, I agree with you that nobody has the right to tell you what to like or dislike. But to say that American Pie is a great movie is streching it a little bit. Dumb and Dumber is actually better. But you know they don’t even consider comedy as part of the cinema history. Apparentely a good movie is supposed to make you sleep… Damn you, Aristotle!

  • JimFranco

    I was just using American Pie as an example, my point being is I don’t need someone to tell me what or what not to like.

  • rejane florinda

    But you should watch Vertigo. It is really great: intriguing, suspensefull, witty. Check it out.

  • JimFranco

    Oh right, I don’t get it right, so I must be dumb yet again. And to say they study the craft and history of film, well so do sports broadcasters but there are many that have never played the game a day in their life. And who’s to say the viewer hasn’t been watching with as much of an insightful eye but just saw beyond sharing their opinion with the world? I very much get it, thanks, but there’s a reason why fields like movie critic are dead, is because people don’t need to read up what someone else thinks because it has no bearing on anything. When Ebert died, it was the last nail in the coffin for critics. Everyday joes can go on Twitter and other social media platforms and post their thoughts in a short sentence on something and chances are if they have a more intimate connection to the reader than ‘Bob Dorel’ from the ‘San Diego Daily’, it’ll be more weighted. But how you come across, pretentious, shows me many are still striving to be critics of everything.

  • JimFranco

    I agree it’s a great film and I’m happy this is at least a variation of the yawner AFI lists, my comment is just in general that there are segments of society that triumph their own critiques over that of the common person, especially when it comes to such subjective things as the arts. Movies/music/TV etc all have very personal ties to the viewer despite if it’s a movie of the week or an Oscar-contender.

  • madisontruth

    No comedies? More evidence that critics have no sense of humor, especially when the tables are turned.

  • Seth Derrick

    I honestly don’t care if you like Duck Dynasty more than Downton Abbey, I don’t think that makes you dumb, but arguing in favor of less informed opinions is pretty dumb. And in since you obviously haven’t noticed the irony: you are attacking people who share their opinion in the thread of a website where you are…wait for it…SHARING YOUR OPINION!

  • Collin

    What about Kurasawa? He never makes these lists that these film critics make.

  • JimFranco

    I wasn’t attacking anyone until d-bags like you chimed in.. Go crawl back into your hole, loser

  • JimFranco

    Further… I don’t claim myself to be a comment critic, or a list critic, or wear some self-imagined title. God, it’s people like you who think others have one-ups on others that make people tune people like critics out in the first place. What makes an opinion on whether someone likes or dislikes a movie exactly? How is someone wrong for liking a movie that someone may not? Get your head of your a$$

  • rejane florinda

    I am actually with you on this one. I just used Dumb and Dumber as a joke, just to point out that even in the comedy genre, making a list is a stupid way to tell people “this is what good cinema is, no matter what you think”. So, are we cool?

  • rejane florinda

    Oh, don’t say that. First, never discard a film just because it is old. I think it is more like snobish people think and believe their taste is better than everybody else’s. Some of the list makers here actually know cinema very well and most of them are terrific directors. They just don’t know how to analyse cinema made after 1969, that’s all.

  • Seth Derrick

    Your opening post was an an attack on movie critics (and, through an analogy, social media consultants).

    I’ll happily crawl out of the hole that is your inability to hold a civil, rational conversation with someone who disagrees with you.

  • med

    Well said: Like

  • Jim McGaw

    Who told you what to like? This is an article that compiles a list of some critics’ favorite films, that’s all. I enjoy reading what people who have devoted their entire lives to something have to say about that subject. I’ve seen all but one of these fiilm, but most of them are not in my top 10. So what?

  • Jim McGaw

    “City Lights” would make my list, too. There are three silent films on the list, however.

  • JimFranco

    You just rubbed the wrong way with your ‘Why don’t people get this?’ as though again, it’s an attack on the same intellect that’s challenged because they’re not ‘critics’. I overreacted, sorry.

  • Sam I Am

    I prefer Rear Window to Vertigo. In addition to being perfectly suspenseful, Rear Window is a smart and witty metaphor about filmmaking itself.

  • JimFranco

    Yeah we’re good

  • Mark Pompeo

    I reject the notion that the top 10 movies ever made all came before 1970. That’s a load of crap. Maybe the quality of the average movie has gone down, but the notion that the best modern movies (yes I’m considering the 70s modern for the sake of this argument) don’t stand up to the best old movies is hogwash.

  • Rincewind54

    Personally I look at movies I’ve seen but can or have seen multiple times. My personal top ten in no particular order: Die Hard, Blazing Sadles, Army of Darkness, Hackers, The Great Race, Kick Ass, Clue, The Princess Bride, Spider Man (2002), Street Fighter (Animated version). Too many honorable mentions to mention. And for quallifications I have seen a lot of movies. I tried to rent a entire Blockbuster (with the help of Rogers Video) over the course of 10 years.

  • Victor Hugo Castro

    I disagree, just by the fact that the most recent movie in that list is from 1968, did that mean that in the 70′s, 80′s, 90′s and so on ther is no a single good movie, i dont think so, the films in the list are great, but…

  • enzofloc

    Vertigo is a fine movie but hardly the greatest. Alas, something had to challenge and usurp Citizen Kane, despite its vastly superior cinematic story-telling style and substance. Perpetual genius can be such a bore.

  • robert

    What, no Tab Hunter filma

  • Rudny Caetano

    Jim… go get some sleep, you are too stressed.

  • Mart

    Film critics? Lolz.

  • Todd

    They all stink.

  • Carl Hofelt

    Vertigo is dreadful, its denouement is perfectly absurd. Rear Window, on the other hand, has a level of verisimilitude lacking in many of Hitchcock’s films. That’s why it stands out.nnAny critic putting Vertigo at the top of the list is doing so out of a misplaced respect for Hitchcock, not out of any appreciation for the craft of film making. Film making is storytelling, if the resolution of that story is this preposterous then you’ve failed as a storyteller.

  • Carl Hofelt

    Sounds like these critics were trying to surprise us with their choices rather than make a serious list.

  • no_more_ozu

    I always see tokyo story on lists like this but I feel it has no place anywhere near it. It’s visually slow for no other reason than making every shot the same length. And i frankly find the cinematography bland. It’s plot is tedious and unrewarding in any aspect. It’s depressing but there’s nothing to the depression that makes it worthwhile, nothing that makes it interesting or intriguing. Just one old couple slowly getting more depressed as they fade into an obscure life. Even the dialogue (though much may be lost in translation) leaves so much to be desired it’s as if Ozu tried to make it as bland and unrealistic as possible. since when do elders not voice their opinions on family matters? Since when do elders just take it and sit silently, especially in Japan where the elderly are held in much higher esteem and respected much more than in the states. They just sit back and take it for what seems like 4 hours of the same two shots over and over again. low shot from the floor, wide shot of the scenery. I cant explain how much this film angers me and I know alot will disagree but Tokyo Story is one of the most unimaginative and disgraceful cinematic ventures out there.

  • Mappy

    Watched it a couple of decades ago. Those are moments of my finite lifespan that I wish I hadn’t wasted on watching Vertigo.

  • Mappy

    So…. Film critics are like autists…. That makes sense.

  • ZandiFandi

    Thats how it goes man, you jsut have to rol lwith it.nnPrivacy-Panet.com

  • Final_Word

    I disagree with your comment!

  • http://yeehee.com/ Yeeheecom

    What about Jason lives part 343 lol

  • xtr

    The Searchers ? i simply dont understand why i rate em 6/10

  • wphayduke

    No arguments with this list but my personal list of top 10 movies would have to include 12 Angry Men, Casablanca, and Almost Famous (especially the Director’s cut). They’re all infinitely re-watchable, which is my test of a classic. I don’t get Citizen Kane, although I do realize it was amazing for it’s time and taught Hollywood a lot of new tricks (and Wells was a genius).

  • Brian January

    No “Die hard”?nnBrian Januarynhttp://brianjanuary.blogspot.com/

  • CH

    I think “Great” implies you could watch it anytime. Maybe 2 of these fit that. nCritically Acclaimed and good are NOT always the same thing.

  • Bernard O’Leary

    WHAT NO “VAN WILDER PARTY LIASON”?! I AM DIAGUSTD WITH THIS LEETISM. YOU FOOLS WOULDN’T NO A GREAT MOVIE IF IT BIT YOU ON THE ASS. THIS IS ALL OBAMA’S FAULT.

  • victorvscn

    Frankly, your example is bullshit. I don’t mean your argument is bullshit, but while liking movies is subjective, whatever the history of cinematography is — meaning there is no knowledge required, opinion is vaccines is supposed to be based on knowledge — at least what the public has agreed on what qualifies as knowledge.nnntl; drnmovies: opinion = opinionnvaccines: knowledge > opinion

  • Greg

    So 3 of the top ten films of all time are from the very end of the silent era, four from 53-63 and none from the last 45 years? Really?

  • Seth Derrick

    So, a Sesame Street song is to be considered the cultural equal of Miles Davis’ “Birth of the Cool” or Beethoven’s 9th Symphony because a child enjoys the song? Have I got that straight? There is no more knowledge to be accumulated about a work of art than what one’s own base emotional reactions might provide? That is is your argument? It is outside the realm of the possible for you that there are narrative subtleties and historical contexts and technical achievements and cultural impact to consider that are less than obvious that, might lend a greater appreciation? Are we to accept that a knock-knock joke or a dirty limerick is the equal of “The Taming of the Shrew” because both cause eruptions of laughter in an audience? nnI stand by my claim that everyone is welcome to their opinion but every opinion isn’t as valuable outside of the owner’s self. More knowledge about a subject always implies a more valuable opinion, in both science and the arts.

  • victorvscn

    You are distorting my argument. As a subjective view, they are equal. Therefore, there is no “better”. But there is “more historically important”, or “more culturally important”, etc.nnnMy point is, being more historically important or w/e is not the same as being better.

  • rejane florinda

    I watched it yesterday just because you mentioned it. Now I have to see vertigo again to compare. Well, these are great films and I have the time. The great thing about these films is that they are still discussed today and we cannot reach a final conclusion. Which one is better? Is it just a matter of taste?

  • http://futureisfiction.com/blog daretoeatapeach

    I love Hitchcock but Vertigo is over-rated. And I couldn’t stand the Searchers.

  • rejane florinda

    I think what he cannot accept is the “authority” of the critics, seth. And I agree with this part of his argument, that we give some of these people much of our own power. I mean, don’t you feel that the list is too “old” and biased. For example, were are the soviet moviemakers in this list. Damn, Tarkovsky made in the 60′s and 70′s. why isn’t he at least mentioned. I mean, cinema kept on evolving and it seems that the list makers didn’t notice. Don’t tell me Woody Allen don’t know soviet movies just because he was too busy doing his own, he is not that old, nor that good. He seems to pay homage to many french directors, why just mention Jean Renoir? In the end, As vitorvscn says, it is more a list of opinions than a list of best films.

  • rejane florinda

    Oh, be honest. You wasted your time in worst films. And you know what I discovered: some films you have to watch again when you are older. Young people not always are prepared to SEE everything. Take bergman, for example (not on the list either) Or, let’s analyse Almodovar. He invented a whole genre himself. But not everyone is prepared to take that kind of openess.

  • rejane florinda

    I kind of like Touch of Evil better than CK…

  • rejane florinda

    wich is good, I do not intend to be right, although in this case I think I have a good point, because there are so many great and iconic movies missing I could only laugh.

  • Kgprophet

    I just rewatched it recently after hearing of it’s supposed greatest film ever status. It isn’t even Hitchcock’s best film.

  • rejane florinda

    but I feel the same way about Prometheus. I thought “It’s riddley scott, how bad can it be?” turns out it is so bad I think it is going to make history as well.

  • rejane florinda

    isn’t it a little suspicious that they recently made a film about him? I don’t believe in coincidences… I think it is a hook to increase audience.

  • Mappy

    Oh, be honest. You’re being passive-aggressive in your attempt to get people to like Vertigo. Caught the film again whilst channel surfing a couple of years ago. Still pretty terrible. My least favourite Hitchcock movie by far. I even like Frenzy more. And it hurts to say that.

  • Jordan Johnson

    well these are movie critics ,most of which have a degree in journalism or cinematography… So they are probably judging on thematics, plot direction, acting etc. Whereas the average person (you or me) judge a movie on if its engaging, interesting, and couldn’t care less if it used a fish eye lense or film technique X so long as it heightened our experience.nnSo in their areas of expertise they probably see these movies of greatest of all time, but the average person would be judging from different criteria, so there could be 2 seperate lists. one for ciritics one for joe average.

  • Sunastar

    Top ten lists should be relegated to the David Letterman show. “These are the best ten thingies of all time.” If they really are, then, without new evidence to change opinion, why does the list change?nnAnswer: Because it gets a page views. Even, or maybe especially, by people like me who think they are BS.nAnd, to the person asking why comedies never make the top lists; comedies make you smile and feel good, critics seem to believe art should wake the hidden sorrow you have buried deep inside. Yeah, we REALLY need to get more in touch with that. Too much joy in the world otherwise.

  • enzofloc

    So what you’re saying is it made you reflect on things like stoicism, silence, static time and the absence of motion…

  • enzofloc

    Probably because he could fill five of the top ten

  • rejane florinda

    you see, it is impossible to say witch film is best based only in subjectivity. And I am not being passive or agressive, just making a comment. I watch movies for the sheer pleasure of it, not to enforce my taste on others. I think film and literature have to be a matter of personal choice. I just enjoy discussing movies and seeing different perspectives. If I had to make a list of best movies I’ve ever seen people would be if not shocked, at least surprised. My top ten movies are not in this list at all. Wich, I think, it’s actually cool. For example, even if vertigo is the one everybody is talking about, my favorite hitchcock film is Psycho.

  • Mugwomp

    Chill out, kid. Your opinion isn’t worth the time or bandwidth. Just be glad there isn’t a minimum age to use the internet.nnnBut I just LOVE that you used “American Pie” as an argument to not wanting to listen to critics about the greatest movies of all time. Priceless. nnnnNow, continue with your tantrum…

  • Mugwomp

    Wow, I must watch Vertigo twice a year (along with Barry Lyndon and some other favorite classics). It always seems like there’s something new to notice. A true work of art.nnnSad how far film has fallen…

  • Mugwomp

    Hitchcock is one of my favorite directors. I’d put Vertigo as his best, without much question. But you definitely have your opinion…

  • lorettajohnson

    Where’s Lee Daniels The Butler????

  • JimFranco

    Okay champ, thanks for chiming in with your 2 cents a few days later. Your opinion really matters so much yourself, Johnnycomelately

  • John_Brennick

    Passion of Joan of Arc? Really?

  • JimFranco

    Especially in this day and age, you go to rottentomatoes.com and half the critiques are written by dudes who bought a website and thus live under this self-appointed moniker of being a critic. A critic is a dime a dozen in this watered-down world. I know what’s high art and what isn’t, but I don’t see movies and assume the average person doesn’t based on what Joe Schmoe thinks of a movie. I see it if it draws me in, just like I buy albums of artists that draw me in. There’s a reason why sites like AV Club and Pitchfork are made fun of for being pretentious, stuffy sites, and it’s because sometimes things don’t need to be broken down and criticized. I don’t think anyone making Grown Ups 2 or my previous example American Pie were hoping they’d sweep the Oscars

  • JimFranco

    Also, on this website you can see Tarintno’s list, which at least seems more honest in what its saying and trying to accomplish. A lot of these lists make it seem like these critics are just trying too hard to sound ‘artsy’ or ‘trendy’ and thus rehashing the past to sound like they know what they’re talking about, as though if they didn’t throw 8 1/2 or Citizen Kane on there they’d be shamed into a laughing stock. Things progress, mean different things to different people, and a lot of these lists are boring. That’s just my critique, though, right on the har-har-har irony that I’m critiquing critics.

  • JimFranco

    Social media consultants, I just noticed this. That’s one of the funniest terms ever. It really epitomizes the ‘made up label’ of job titles. I remember I had ‘social media’ a year ago in my Twitter profile last yr and got so many adds from people claiming that as their job. Then you’d go to their website and they’re just rehashing other articles and nothing is ever advanced and I’d bet dollar to donuts that a small fraction made any money off such a position if anything. You’d be better off having ‘fry cook’ or ‘janitor’ on your resume, I’ve talked to many employers who laugh at the ‘social media consultant’ label.

  • Martin Cohen

    That’s because there were no comedies in the list.

  • TheKlot

    99% of these critics were over the age of 75. 1% was pretending to be too cool for the room.n

  • Duder20

    His/her name is Mugwomp.

  • JimFranco

    Troll harder

  • rg57

    There is no such thing as “greatest film of all time” however, I give that title to “The Act of Killing”, which recently displaced my previous favourite “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King”.nnnWhat does it mean to be “greatest” for me? Certainly it must be memorable. It must show technical expertise (and not just for its own time period). It must connect with the audience on all levels: e.g. cognitive, visceral, emotional, visual. It must say something.nnnI do not think “Citizen Kane” belongs on the list, nor does “The Searchers” (certainly that’s the WTF choice).nnnBut I’m glad “Tokyo Story” and “2001″ made it.

  • jorian

    +1

  • enzofloc

    What critic would be adverse to including The Godfather, Raging Bull, Pulp Fiction and Mulhulland Drive to cover four more decades?

  • enzofloc

    His Girl Friday snubbed again.

  • rejane florinda

    I am dying to watch “The act of Killing” but it didn’t come to theatres here yet. On another note… do you really like “the return of the king” better than “the two towers”? Even with the bad acting? I do not deny I like the film,I expected the acting to escalade into something more deep and meaningful. For me only Ian Mckellen seems to notice that the quest changed the characters,

  • rejane florinda

    I don’t think that is the only reason people feel so outraged by these lists. I think it is more related to the fact that more recent productions may have contributed definetely to cinema as an art media and most of them are not included in this list.nAnd also, what qualifies a journalist to become a film critic? Unless she or he is more than informed, it doesn’t make sense that their vote is more important than anyone else’s. I think people want to be included in a way that doesn’t make everybody feel snubbed by critics, and that is a legitimate feeling, The public is a great part of cinema history, that should count for something. We are not only joes and janes. Many of us know about cinema, or at least know enough to make educated comments, point contradictions and ask more than interesting questions. So not just a bunch of nobodies…

  • shark

    this is the stupidest list ever made… get a grip ppl…we are all not 85 and counting.. i would rather kiss a public urinal then watch any of these

  • CVal

    It’s according to only 846 film critics. There are a lot more. Calm yo tits.

  • Bertin

    What makes a movie a great movie? It should be well crafted and an inovation of storytelling. And it should work and be acceptabel by the viewer (critic). How does a film end up high in a list? Many people have to have seen it and accepted it. The reason why critics prefer old movies over the latest blockbusters is that it is easier to spot originality and inovation that will later be accepted. I would prefer Being John Malcovitch, Punch Drunk Love, Entonement, Repossesion, Ferris Bueller’s day off, Black Swan etcetera but these films are all influenced by earlier films.

  • Stefan

    10 films I enjoy seeing once a year: “A Room With A View”, Depardieu’s “Cyrano d’Bergerac”, “Seven Samurai”, “Big Night”, “Babette’s Feast”, “Amadeus”, “Short Cuts”, “The Big Lebowski”, “Groundhog Day”, “Casablanca”…happily there are plenty of pretty good movies…

  • Rebecca

    Stroszek and Schindler’s List override any Woody Allen film.

  • Mike

    Watch everything and decide for yourself. Never take a list, even a list from 800+ film critics, as gospel. Watch everything and decide for yourself what is good, what is bad, and what is great.

  • Michael Starks

    No Bergman? No Kurosawa? Who are these 846 critics, high school journalism students?

  • Geert bakker

    Great movies

  • Juliette 1964

    So what is the greatest film or films of all time .?????! . Surely it depends on the individual . Their age . Lifestyle . And personality . !!! . I found my self drawn to liking the most not very me films . . Critics?????? .not all critics represent the public! In fact I would most do not . But to dismiss another persons opinion is rude . It’s your opinion . And your opinion only . And at the end of the day ..it’s up to joe public Not arty farty folk who think their opinion is the word . . And I,m sure your reading this and saying ” that’s rubbish ” ha ha . Bothered NOT x

  • Maricarmen

    Critics don’t always know everything about a film, the same happens with dance, lots of them have not even taken a dance lesson, so how can they give an opinion on what they have never executed and don’t know the technics, etc.? Sorry but I don’t agree with your list and of course I am not a critic, just a normal human being. I am an expert about dance and I read very few critics cause most of them are usually wrong. Good night.

  • Joan Hager

    I have watched Vertigo many times in my 71 years, each time trying to see why some consider this a great film – I find it artificial and pretentious – and I love Jimmy Stewart – This is a list with really old movies – I think Citizen Kane belongs on the list – perhaps Sunrise ( very dated though) – otherwise, there are so many more from which to choose.

  • Surrey ABC

    What! No, Les Enfans Du Paradis?

    This is the greatest French film of all time. Having watched it again recently, it just gets better and better. Whereas Kane is a bravura one off performance, this is superb ensemble piece. All done in occupied France.

    It really is a Epic film.

  • Hoppo

    Lady from Shanghai over Kane any day.

  • Kier

    you know whats great about all these comments? seeing that people believe that films like pulp fiction, or goodfellas or any david lynch are actually one of the greatest films of all time.

  • Misha

    “Wild strawberries” by Ingemar Bergman and
    “Andrei Rublev” by Andrei Tarkovsky bust have been on the list!

  • megawstt

    What about El Topo or. The Holy Mountain ? Clearly this was a biased vote..thumbs down..

  • Paul Tatara

    I am utterly dumbfounded by the praise that gets heaped upon “Tokyo Story.” I think it’s a fine film, obviously, but I simply don’t get why people go nuts over it. (If push comes to shove, I’ll go with “The Passion of Joan of Arc.”)

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