Langston Hughes Presents the History of Jazz in an Illustrated Children’s Book (1955)

≡ Category: K-12, Music |4 Comments

I can imagine no better guide through the history and variety of jazz than Langston Hughes, voice of the Harlem Renaissance and poetic interpreter of 20th century black American culture. Hughes’ 1955 First Book of Jazz is just that, a short primer with a surprisingly high degree of sophistication for a children’s book.

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Isaac Newton Creates a List of His 57 Sins (Circa 1662)

≡ Category: History, Physics, Religion, Science |8 Comments

Sir Isaac Newton, arguably the most important and influential scientist in history, discovered the laws of motion and the universal force of gravity. For the first time ever, the rules of the universe could be described with the supremely rational language of mathematics.

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President Obama Chats with David Simon About Drugs, The Wire & Omar

≡ Category: Politics, Television |1 Comment

Back in 2012, President Obama, already on record as being a fan of The Wire, was asked by ESPN to name his favorite character on the show, to which he replied “It’s got to be Omar, right? I mean, that guy is unbelievable, right?” Fast forward to 2015, and we find Mr.

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The Visionary Thought of Marshall McLuhan, Introduced and Demystified by Tom Wolfe

≡ Category: Media, Philosophy |Leave a Comment

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Marshall McLuhan and Tom Wolfe: both writers, both astute observers of modern humanity, and both public figures whose work has, over the years, enjoyed high fashionability and endured high unfashionability. You might think the connection between them ends there.

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How Can I Know Right From Wrong? Watch Philosophy Animations on Ethics Narrated by Harry Shearer

≡ Category: Animation, Philosophy |6 Comments

The history of moral philosophy in the West hinges principally on a handful of questions: Is there a God of some sort? An afterlife? Free will? And, perhaps most pressingly for humanists, what exactly is the nature of our obligations to others? The latter question has long occupied philosophers like Immanuel Kant, whose extreme formulati

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Leo Tolstoy’s 17 “Rules of Life:” Wake at 5am, Help the Poor, & Only Two Brothel Visits Per Month

≡ Category: Life, Literature, Writing |4 Comments

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Many aspiring epic novelists surely wouldn’t mind writing like Leo Tolstoy.

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Download Images From Rad American Women A-Z: A New Picture Book on the History of Feminism

≡ Category: Art, History, K-12, Life |Leave a Comment

The next time story hour rolls around, you can give a mouse a cookie or you can awaken pre-readers (and yourself) to some key figures in women’s history. 26 of them, to be precise. It’s no accident that that number corresponds to the exact number of letters in the alphabet.

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George Mason Students Create Revolutionary Fire Extinguisher That Uses Sound Waves to Blow Out Fires

≡ Category: Technology |Leave a Comment

If you haven’t seen it already: two George Mason University engineering students — Viet Tran and Seth Robertson — have created a potentially revolutionary device, a new-fangled fire extinguisher, that uses low-frequency sound waves to snuff out fires.

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A Short Animated History of Daylight Saving Time, Narrated by Stephen Fry

≡ Category: Animation, Economics, History |Leave a Comment

Several weeks back, we contemplated how, in the 1650s, the economic history of the West changed irrevocably when Christiaan Huygens invented the pendulum clock  — a timepiece that enabled us to measure time in accurate, uniform ways, making us attentive to the passage of time and focus on things like productivity and performance.

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Download 464 Free Art Books from The Metropolitan Museum of Art

≡ Category: Art, Books |75 Comments

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You could pay $118 on Amazon for the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s catalog The Art of Illumination: The Limbourg Brothers and the Belles Heures of Jean de France, Duc de Berry.

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