Man Ray Creates a “Surrealist Chessboard,” Featuring Portraits of Surrealist Icons: Dalí, Breton, Picasso, Magritte, Miró & Others (1934)

≡ Category: Art, Photography |1 Comment

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Like most artists, Emmanuel Radnitzky had more than one major interest in his life. We who know him as Man Ray usually first encounter him through his photography, such as the artist and writer portraits featured here at Open Culture last year. But Man Ray himself ultimately considered painting his main creative field.

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The Photography of Poet Arthur Rimbaud (1883)

≡ Category: Photography, Poetry |Leave a Comment

Arthur Rimbaud, far-seeing prodigy, “has been memorialized in song and story as few in history,” writes Wyatt Mason in an introduction to the poet’s complete works; “the thumbnail of his legend has proved irresistible.

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An Introduction to Digital Photography: Take a Free Course from Stanford Prof/Google Researcher Marc Levoy

≡ Category: How to Learn for Free, Online Courses, Photography |Leave a Comment

Photography and video have advanced to such a degree that any one of us, for a modest investment of capital, can own the requisite equipment to make productions at the same level of quality as the pros. And most of us already hold in our hands computers capable of producing and editing hundreds of rich still and moving images.

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Eadweard Muybridge’s Motion Photography Experiments from the 1870s Presented in 93 Animated Gifs

≡ Category: Animation, Photography |1 Comment

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When a horse trots, do all four of its hooves ever leave the ground at once? At one time, we not only had no answer to that question, we had no way of finding out.

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The History of Russia in 70,000 Photos: New Photo Archive Presents Russian History from 1860 to 1999

≡ Category: History, Photography |1 Comment

Back in college, I took a survey class on Russian history, taught by one of these people who take up the profession in their active retirement after a career spent working in the field. This particular professor had gone to work for the State Department after graduate school and served in various posts in Soviet Russia for several decades.

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Download 100,000 Photos of 20 Great U.S. National Parks, Courtesy of the U.S. National Park Service

≡ Category: History, Photography |2 Comments

The story of the U.S.’s national parks isn’t one story, but many. These have been told and retold since the founding of the National Park Service, a century ago this past Thursday. And they stretch back even further, to the Civil War, the conquering and settling of the west, and the beginnings of the American conservation movement.

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1850s Japan Comes to Life in 3D, Color Photos: See the Stereoscopic Photography of T. Enami

≡ Category: History, Photography |2 Comments

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For about a quarter of a millennium, Japan had a policy called sakoku, literally meaning “closed country,” which put to death foreigners who dared enter to Japan, or Japanese who dared to leave it.

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Rome Comes to Life in Photochrom Color Photos Taken in 1890: The Colosseum, Trevi Fountain & More

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For almost two hundred years, English gentlemen could not consider their education complete until they had taken the “Grand Tour” of Europe, usually culminating in Naples, “ragamuffin capital of the Italian south,” writes Ian Thomson at The Spectator.

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The History of Photography in Five Animated Minutes: From Camera Obscura to Camera Phone

≡ Category: Photography |1 Comment

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We find ourselves, still early in the 21st century, in an unprecedented era in the history of photography. The consumers of the developed world have, of course, had access to cameras of their own for decades and decades, but now almost each and every one of us walks around with a camera in our pocket.

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Behold the Very First Color Photograph (1861): Taken by Scottish Physicist (and Poet!) James Clerk Maxwell

≡ Category: Photography |1 Comment

Since its ancient origins as the camera obscura, the photographic camera has always mimicked the human eye, allowing light to enter an aperture, then projecting an image upside down. Renaissance artists relied on the camera obscura to sharpen their own visual perspectives.

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