Watch Scenes from Belle Époque Paris Vividly Restored with Artificial Intelligence (Circa 1890)

In his latest act of digital restoration, Denis Shiryaev has used AI to revive and colorize footage documenting daily life in Paris during the 1890s. The remarkably clear footage lets you see horses and buggies move past Notre Dame; youngsters floating their boats at Luxembourg Gardens; the Eiffel Tour during its first decade of existence; firemen dashing down the city's grands boulevards; and people hopping onto futuristic moving sidewalks. Quite a delight to see.

Find other recent video restorations in the Relateds below.

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Alan Turing Will Be Featured on England’s New £50 Banknote

This week, the Bank of England announced that it will feature Alan Turing on its £50 banknote, thus completing the political rehabilitation of the English mathematician, computer scientist and code breaker. The new note will go into circulation in 2021. Find more at The Guardian.

Would you like to support the mission of Open Culture? Please consider making a donation to our site. It's hard to rely 100% on ads, and your contributions will help us continue providing the best free cultural and educational materials to learners everywhere.

Also consider following Open Culture on Facebook and Twitter and sharing intelligent media with your friends. Or sign up for our daily email and get a daily dose of Open Culture in your inbox. 

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A Turing Machine Handmade Out of Wood

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Bryan Cranston Narrates the Landing on Omaha Beach on the 75th Anniversary of the D-Day Invasion

75 years ago today, the Allies launched the D-Day invasion in Normandy, which marked a critical turning point in World War II--the beginning of the freeing of Europe from Nazi control. Above, actor Bryan Cranston commemorates the anniversary by reading a letter that Pfc. Dominick "Dom" Bart sent to his wife. A 32-year-old infantryman, Bart took part in the harrowing first wave of the massive amphibious assault. Below, we also hear Cranston reading the words of Pfc. Jim “Pee Wee” Martin, describing "his first taste of battle as a paratrooper in the D-Day invasion." As Cranston reads, you can watch "never-before-seen restored high-resolution 4K footage from Omaha Beach."

Would you like to support the mission of Open Culture? Please consider making a donation to our site. It's hard to rely 100% on ads, and your contributions will help us continue providing the best free cultural and educational materials to learners everywhere.

Also consider following Open Culture on Facebook and Twitter and sharing intelligent media with your friends. Or sign up for our daily email and get a daily dose of Open Culture in your inbox. 

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Free Audio: Bryan Cranston, Breaking Bad Star, Reads First Chapter of The Things They Carried

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Bryan Cranston Gives Advice to the Young: Find Yourself by Traveling and Getting Lost

The Who and Jimmy Fallon Sing “Won’t Get Fooled Again” with Classroom Instruments

Don't miss the very end. And don't miss The Who on tour this summer...

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Free: Play the Original “Minecraft” in Your Browser

A quick heads up from Engadget: “Minecraft is celebrating its 10th birthday by making its Classic version easily playable on web browsers. You don't need to download any files to make it work, and you don't have to pay a cent for access. Since Classic was only the second phase in the game's development cycle, its features are pretty limited. You'll only have 32 blocks to work with, most of which are dyed wool, and it's strictly creative mode only. But who needs zombies, skeletons and other mobs when you have the version's decade-old bugs to contend with, anyway?”

Click here to launch in your browser. Find more vintage video games you can play in your browser below.

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Download the ModulAir, a Free Polyphonic Synthesizer, and Make Your Own Electronic Sounds

Over the years, we've talked a fair share about electronic music--from the earliest days of the genre, through contemporary times. Now, we give you a chance to make your own electronic sounds.

According to Synthopia, a portal devoted to electronic music, "Full Bucket Music has released ModulAir 1.0 – a free polyphonic modular synthesizer for Mac & Windows." (For the uninitiated, a polyphonic synthesizer--versus a monophonic one--can play multiple notes at once.) The ModulAir "is a modular polyphonic software synthesizer for Microsoft Windows (VST) and Apple macOS (VST/AU), written in native C++ code for high performance and low CPU consumption." Watch a demo above, and download it here.

via Synthopia

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The Lighter Side of Stephen Hawking: The Physicist Cracks Jokes and a Smile with John Oliver

In our tribute to Stephen Hawking earlier today, we discussed the intellectual legacy of the departed physicist, paying particular attention to his groundbreaking work on black holes. The video above is a bit lighter. It just lets you watch Hawking in a comedic exchange with his compatriot John Oliver. If I'm not mistaken, around the 3:46 mark, you can even see him crack a smile. Enjoy.

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