Carl Sagan’s Ambitious College Reading List: Plato, Shakespeare, Gide, and Plenty of Philosophy, Math & Physics (1954)

≡ Category: Books, Science |Leave a Comment

vimeo.com/channels/

Carl Sagan may have passed away almost twenty years ago, but he continues to influence minds of all generations through intellectual heirs like Neil DeGrasse Tyson (host of the remake of Sagan’s beloved 1980 TV series Cosmos) as well as through the books he wrote in his lifetime.

[...]

What Character Traits Do Geniuses Share in Common?: From Isaac Newton to Richard Feynman

≡ Category: Science |2 Comments

Back in 1993, James Gleick wrote Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman. A decade later came his biography on Isaac Newton. As Gleick mentions above, the two scientists–who lived, of course, centuries apart–shared very little in common. Newton (1643-1727) was “solitary, antisocial, unpleasant, bitter.

[...]

Watch Online Leonardo DiCaprio’s New Documentary on Climate Change, Before the Flood (Free for a Limited Time)

≡ Category: Current Affairs, Film, Science |1 Comment

Briefly noted: Right now, on National Geographic’s YouTube channel, you can watch Leonardo DiCaprio’s new documentary Before the Flood. Here’s a quick summary:
Before the Flood, directed by Fisher Stevens, captures a three-year personal journey alongside Academy Award-winning actor and U.N.

[...]

Videos Recreate Isaac Newton’s Neat Alchemy Experiments: Watch Silver Get Turned Into Gold

≡ Category: History, Science |Leave a Comment

Yesterday we featured an online archive of “chymical” manuscripts from the hand of Isaac Newton, who, in addition to modern physics and mathematics, practiced the magical, medieval art of alchemy.

[...]

Isaac Newton’s Recipe for the Mythical ‘Philosopher’s Stone’ Is Being Digitized & Put Online (Along with His Other Alchemy Manuscripts)

≡ Category: Archives, History, Science |Leave a Comment

In his 1686 Principia Mathematica, Isaac Newton elaborated not only his famous Law of Gravity, but also his Three Laws of Motion, setting a centuries-long trend for scientific three-law sets. Newton’s third law has by far proven his most popular: “every action has an equal and opposite reaction.” In Arthur C.

[...]

Goethe’s Colorful & Abstract Illustrations for His 1810 Treatise, Theory of Colors: Scans of the First Edition

≡ Category: Art, Books, History, Science |1 Comment

The great Jewish philosopher Baruch Spinoza, it is said, drew his conceptions of god and the universe from his work as an optician, grinding lenses day after day. He lived a life singularly devoted to glass, in which his “evenings to evenings are equal.

[...]

Periodic Table Battleship!: A Fun Way To Learn the Elements

≡ Category: Creativity, Games, K-12, Science |1 Comment

www.youtube.com/watch?v=GkwMDkfrZ1M”>you

Nitrogen.
Phosphorous.
Arsenic.
Aw, you sunk my battleship!
Milton Bradley’s classic board game, Battleship, can now be added to the roster of fun, creative ways to commit the Periodic Table of Elements to memory.
Karyn Tripp, a homeschooling mother of four, was inspired by her eldest’s love of science to create Periodic Table Battleship.

[...]

Artificial Intelligence Program Tries to Write a Beatles Song: Listen to “Daddy’s Car”

≡ Category: Music, Science |8 Comments

Last May, we told you about Flow Machine, an artificial intelligence-driven music composer that analyses composer’s styles and then creates new works from that data.

[...]

David Byrne & Neil deGrasse Tyson Explain the Importance of an Arts Education (and How It Strengthens Science & Civilization)

≡ Category: Art, Creativity, Education, Science |6 Comments

Unless you’re a policy geek or an educator, you may never have heard of the “STEM vs. STEAM” debate. STEM, of course, stands for the formula of “science, technology, engineering, and mathematics” as a baseline for educational curriculum.

[...]

Carl Sagan & the Dalai Lama Meet in 1991 and Discuss When Science Can Answer Big Questions Better Than Religion

≡ Category: Religion, Science |Leave a Comment

Images via Wikimedia Commons
In a 1997 essay in Natural History, Stephen Jay Gould (in)famously called the realms of religion and science “Nonoverlapping Magisteria”—a phrase that acknowledges both endeavors as equally powerful and important to human life.

[...]

Keep Looking »
Quantcast