Behold the Largest Atlas in the World: The Six-Foot Tall Klencke Atlas from 1660

≡ Category: Books, Maps |3 Comments

Last week, we featured the free digital edition of the The History of Cartography. Or what’s been called “the most ambitious overview of map making ever undertaken.” The three-volume series contains illustrations of countless maps, produced over hundreds of years.


The History of Cartography, the “Most Ambitious Overview of Map Making Ever,” Now Free Online

≡ Category: Books, Maps |2 Comments

Worth a quick mention: The University of Chicago Press has made available online — at no cost — the first three volumes of The History of Cartography. Or what Edward Rothstein, of The New York Times, called “the most ambitious overview of map making ever undertaken.


A Wonderful Scientific Map of the Moon from 1679: Can You Spot the Secret Moon Maiden?

≡ Category: Art, Astronomy, Maps, Science |Leave a Comment

Millions watched as astronaut Neil Armstrong put boots to the moon in 1969.
It was, as he famously remarked, one “giant leap for mankind,” but from a scientific standpoint the territory was far from virgin.


12 Classic Literary Road Trips in One Handy Interactive Map

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Fantasy fiction invariably includes a map for readers to understand the hero’s journey, literally. We know that Hobbits had to walk a long way into Mordor, but seeing it cartographically really hits home.


A 1932 Illustrated Map of Harlem’s Night Clubs: From the Cotton Club to the Savoy Ballroom

≡ Category: Comics/Cartoons, History, Maps, Music |Leave a Comment”>holiday

Harlem’s undergoing another Renaissance of late. Crime’s down, real estate prices are up, and throngs of pale-faced hipsters are descending to check the area out.
Sure, something’s gained, but something’s lost, too.
For today’s holiday in Harlem, we’re going to climb in the Wayback Machine. Set the dial for 1932.


Map Showing Where Today’s Countries Would Be Located on Pangea

≡ Category: Maps |6 Comments

The supercontinent of Pangea formed some 270 million years ago, during the Early Permian Period, and then began to break up 70 million years later, eventually yielding the continents we inhabit today. Pangea was, of course, a peopleless place. But if you were to drop today’s nations on that great land mass, here’s what it might look like.


The Art of Mapping Music: Mike Hamad’s 200 Schematics of Songs by Phish, Pink Floyd & The Dead

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Mike Hamad, a music writer for The Hartford Courant, has a deep and abiding love for Phish. He also has a talent for drawing “schematics” or maps that turn the experience of listening to music into something visual.


World War I Unfolds in a Three Minute Time-Lapse Film: Every Day From 1914 to 1918

≡ Category: Animation, History, Maps |3 Comments

As time places us ever further from the event, our knowledge of (and—generally speaking—interest in World War I) has shrunk precipitously.  That trend is reversing as the centennial of Archduke Franz Ferdinand’s assassination draws nigh.


New York Public Library Puts 20,000 Hi-Res Maps Online & Makes Them Free to Download and Use

≡ Category: History, Maps, Technology |8 Comments

When I was a kid, my father brought home from I know not where an enormous collection of National Geographic magazines spanning the years 1917 to 1985. I found, tucked in almost every issue, one of the magazine’s gorgeous maps—of the Moon, St. Petersburg, the Himalayas, Eastern Europe’s ever-shifting boundaries.


New Google-Powered Site Tracks Global Deforestation in ‘Near-Real-Time’

≡ Category: Current Affairs, Environment, Google, Maps |Leave a Comment

In September we told you about trillions of satellite images of Earth, generated by the Landsat, that are now available to the public.
Now we can share an interactive tool that is using some of those Landsat images to stop illegal deforestation.


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